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Monday Morning Ready05.18.2018
Jumpstart Your Week!

Cigarette smoke can make a person lightheaded in a nauseous get-me-out of here way. It can incite long rants about the dangers of lung cancer and the evils of the tobacco industry. And it can also, according to a recent study, pump up the powers of bacteria invading a person’s body.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Smoking harms your body in many different ways. Why do you think many people still smoke?

Grade 5-6

According to the article, both MRSA infection rates and smoking rates are on the decline. Do you think this proves a connection or do you think it's more than likely a coincidence? Why?

Grade 7-8

Before you read this article, did you think e-cigarettes were a safer way to smoke? After reading the article, are you reconsidering your opinion? Why or why not?

Grade 9-10

According to the article, researchers don't yet know why cigarette smoke makes the superbug MRSA more aggressive. One theory is that smoke could alter the charge of the MRSA's cell walls. What other possibilities do you researchers should consider?

LESSON PLAN
Create an Anti-Smoking PSA

PROCESS:

  1. Prior to conducting this activity, obtain examples of public service announcements from print media, radio and television.
  2. Present the examples to the class. Discuss how they are alike and different. Guide students to recognize that, regardless of the format used, each of these is an example of a public service announcement (PSA). Explain to students that a PSA is more than an advertisement. It is a message to the public that is intended to raise awareness or change people's attitudes or behavior toward a social issue.
  3. Discuss the basic elements of a PSA. Point out that the content and approach of the message can vary widely, depending on the target audience. Then have students describe PSAs they've seen that were designed to deter people from smoking. Which ads did students think were most creative? Which do they think might have had the biggest impact? How did the ads targeting adults differ from those targeting children?
  4. Have students conduct research to identify facts about the impact of smoking. Encourage them to search for odd facts or facts that people might not be familiar with, such as the connection between smoke and MRSA that was described in the article.
  5. Give students time to create a PSA for an anti-smoking campaign. Invite them to share their finished products with the class.

ASSESSMENT:

As students present their public service announcements, challenge classmates to identify the purpose and central message of each. Discuss how the content and approach of each message is tailored to attract a specific target audience.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
As a class, conduct research to identify odd or lesser-known facts about the impact of smoking. Choose one fact from the list. Select a target audience. Then decide which medium-print, radio or TV-should be used. Divide the class into small groups. Provide the necessary supplies-art materials and poster board, audio equipment or digital cameras. Have each group create an anti-smoking PSA that meets all of the requirements the class selected.
Grades 5-6:
As a class, conduct research to identify odd or lesser-known facts about the impact of smoking. Identify the target audience and decide whether to develop the PSA for print, radio, or TV. Provide the necessary supplies-art materials and poster board, audio equipment or digital cameras-for the medium selected. Then divide the class into small groups. Encourage each group to select one fact from the list. Give groups time to create an anti-smoking PSA. Remind students to keep the target audience in mind as they write and produce their messages.
Grades 7-8:
Divide the class into small groups. Instruct each group to conduct research to identify odd or lesser-known facts about the impact of smoking. Encourage groups to select one or more facts from their lists, identify a target audience and select the medium-print, radio or TV-that they would like to use. Provide art supplies and poster board for groups creating print messages and audio equipment or digital cameras for those developing announcements for radio or TV. Challenge each group to develop a unique and appropriate message that will attract the specified target audience.
Grades 9-10:
Assign each student a partner. Instruct pairs to conduct research to identify odd or lesser-known facts about the impact of smoking. Encourage them to select facts that they would like to incorporate into their anti-smoking campaign. Then give partners time to brainstorm creative ways to get their message across to two different target audiences or through two different mediums. Provide access to art supplies and poster board, audio equipment and digital cameras. Give pairs time to create two different PSAs. As partners present, challenge them to explain how addressing a different audience or using a different medium influenced the content and approach of their message.
VISUAL RESOURCES: WORLD NO TOBACCO DAY: HIGHLIGHTS COLLECTION
SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
Teen Smoking: Designing a School Anti-Smoking Publicity Campaign
In this teacher-created lesson from the Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, high school students create the visuals for an anti-smoking publicity campaign based on their research into the effects of smoking.

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: 20th Century Tobacco Advertisements
Not so long ago, tobacco advertisements were common. They showed healthy, vigorous, fun-loving people. Some ads featured famous athletes and celebrities. Others had actors portraying doctors, dentists and scientists. Read this article from the National Museum of American History to explore the tobacco industry’s reliance on advertising during the mid-20th century.

Smoking a Pack a Day for a Year Leaves 150 Mutations in Every Lung Cell
Researchers quantify just how bad smoking is for you, molecularly. Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn more about their findings.

When NASA Told Its Astronauts to Quit Smoking
In the 1950s, smoking was generally accepted in the U.S. In fact, more than half of American men smoked. Read this article from the Smithsonian’s Air & Space magazine to learn why NASA asked its Apollo astronauts to refrain from smoking in public.

The World’s “Ugliest” Color Could Help People Quit Smoking
Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn how officials hope color and hideous packaging could make would-be smokers think twice.

Ads for E-Cigarettes Today Hearken Back to the Banned Tricks of Big Tobacco
Read this Smithsonian article to learn how a new ‘Joe Camel’-esque phenomenon may be igniting as the new fad takes a 21st-century page out of an old playbook.
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