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Monday Morning Ready03.16.2018
Jumpstart Your Week!

When Susan B. Anthony died in 1906 at age 86, her funeral overflowed with mourners. Despite the fact that there was a blizzard raging in Rochester, New York, thousands packed into the church service and over 10,000 others showed up to pass by her flag-draped coffin and pay their respects. On election day, over a century later, admirers of the suffrage icon came to her grave with a different kind of tribute—dozens of “I Voted” stickers.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Do you think putting "I Voted" stickers on Susan B. Anthony's grave is a good way to honor her legacy? Why or why not?

Grade 5-6

According to the article, women put "I Voted stickers on Susan B. Anthony's grave to honor her legacy. Think of another famous woman from the past. How do you think people should honor her legacy?

Grade 7-8

Susan B. Anthony spent more than 60 years fighting for equality for women. What cause would you spend your entire life fighting for? Why is this cause so important to you?

Grade 9-10

What do you think the United States would be like today if people like Susan B. Anthony had not fought for equal rights for women more than 100 years ago? If Susan B. Anthony were alive today, what rights do you think she would be fighting for now?

LESSON PLAN
Honor a Woman Who Fought for Equal Rights

PROCESS:

  1. Invite students to share what they know about Susan B. Anthony. Remind them that today, more than a century after her death, admirers leave flowers and "I Voted" stickers at her grave. Rather than seeing this as litter or vandalism, the cemetery where she is buried loves the tribute. It's seen as a way of interacting with and honoring her legacy.
  2. Point out that Susan B. Anthony wasn't alone in her fight for women's rights. Many women joined her. Before her there were other battles. And even now, women fight for change.
  3. Have students select another woman who has fought for change. Instruct them to conduct research to learn about the woman, the issue she battled and how she went about fighting for change.
  4. Encourage students to think of a fitting way to pay tribute to this woman. Once they have an idea, instruct students to write a brief summary about the woman's fight and draw a picture showing how they would honor the woman for her part in the battle for women's rights.

ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to share their tributes with the class. Based on what they've learned about the woman, what she fought for and how she went about it, encourage students to explain why they think their tribute is a fitting way to honor the woman and her fight for equal rights.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
As a class, conduct research to identify a variety of women who have fought for change. Have students vote to select one woman to study further. Have the class conduct research to learn about that woman and her fight. Then divide the class into small groups. Have each group think of a fitting way to honor the woman. Instruct groups to write a brief summary about the woman's fight and a draw picture of their idea.
Grades 5-6:
Divide the class into small groups. Instruct groups to identify a variety of women who have fought for change. Encourage them to select one woman to study further. Give groups time to conduct research. Then have them think of a fitting way to honor the woman. Instruct groups to write a brief summary about the woman's fight and a draw picture of their idea.
Grades 7-8:
Divide the class into pairs. Instruct partners to select one topic or field of study and identify a woman who has fought for change in that area. Have students conduct research to learn more about the woman and the issue she was fighting for. Then have them think of a fitting way to honor the woman. Instruct partners to write a brief summary about the woman's fight and a draw picture of their idea.
Grades 9-10:
Encourage each student to select one woman who has or is fighting for equal rights. Give students time to conduct research to learn more about the woman, what she was fighting for and how she went about it. Given all they've learned, encourage students to think of a fitting way to honor the woman for her efforts. Have students summarize what they learned and draw a picture of their tribute. Challenge them to give insightful reasons as they explain why their idea is a fitting way to pay tribute to this woman for her part in the fight for women's rights.
VISUAL RESOURCES: WOMEN'S HISTORY IN AMERICA
SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
Women Who Shaped History
For Women’s History Month and a new Smithsonian-wide initiative, Smithsonian.com has collected representative examples of its coverage of diverse women throughout history. Ultimately, this is a journey not just of American women—but of America herself.

Women’s Suffrage
Introduce students to early pioneers in the fight for women’s rights, including Susan B. Anthony, with this collection from the National Portrait Gallery.

Women’s History Month 2018
In celebration of Women’s History Month 2018, the Smithsonian Transcription Center invites you to transcribe collections highlighting the historical contributions of women in science, technology and art to make these collections more accessible. Check out his site to learn how you can help spread the word.

Women’s Rights
This Smithsonian History Explorer inquiry, targeted to middle school students, examines the emergence of the women’s suffrage movement in the 19th century as an effort to expand women’s political and economic rights. It extends that investigation into the present.

Document Deep Dive: A Historic Moment in the Fight for Women’s Voting Rights
A cartoonist diagrammed the parade—5,000 suffragists strong—that defiantly marched in Washington more than 100 years ago. Read this Smithsonian article to learn more about this historic event.

Reading "Mama Went to Jail for the Vote"
The strategies in this lesson will help teachers and lower elementary students actively read "Mama Went to Jail for the Vote" together. This historical fiction is about a girl whose mother joins the suffragists to win the vote for women.

Women’s Rights Collection
This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection explores the key components and changes that have occurred during the struggle for women’s rights. It is meant to spark discussion about the movement and its long-term impact on history and the issues that still face women in their fight for gender equality today.

Women’s Liberation
Enjoy this collection of songs highlighting women’s liberation that was created by Smithsonian Folkways in recognition of the 2017 Women’s March on Washington.

History of Voting in the United States: Create a Virtual Exhibit
This lesson plan examines an 1898 Standard Voting Machine and the democratization of the voting process in the U .S. It includes an introduction to doing history with objects, three lesson plans on the history of voting, and annotated links related to the extension of voting rights to women and African Americans.
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