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Monday Morning Ready06.06.2019
Jumpstart Your Week!

When scuba diving instructor Linda Nelson tells people that there’s an ocean in the middle of landlocked Utah, they look at her in disbelief. For the past 30 years she’s been luring scuba divers and snorkelers to Bonneville Seabase, a chain of warm, spring-fed pools located on an expanse of desert about 40 miles west of Salt Lake City.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

How do you think scuba diving in Bonneville Seabase and scuba diving in the ocean would be alike? How would they be different?

Grade 5-6

Have you ever heard of a natural phenomenon that might be considered stranger than an ocean in the middle of landlocked Utah? If so, what is it? If not, what is the strangest landmark you do know about?

Grade 7-8

According to the article, after Linda Nelson and George Sanders bought Bonneville Seabase many of the experts they spoke with told them fish would never survive there based on salinity levels and geography. They tried-and succeeded-with their plans anyway. Would you have taken that risk? Why or why not?

Grade 9-10

What kind of specialized knowledge would you need to run an operation like Bonneville Seabase? How could that expertise influence your operating strategy when, as the article indicated, conditions at the site keep changing?

LESSON PLAN
Promote a Little-Known Tourist Attraction

PROCESS:

  1. Have students conduct research to identify interesting but little-known tourist attractions around the world. Encourage them to select one site and continue investigating to learn more about it.
  2. Instruct students to analyze the information they collected to identify the site's most interesting qualities and to determine why it isn't better known.
  3. Have students discuss the type of person who would be most likely to visit this site. Encourage them to brainstorm ideas about how they could reach that target audience and introduce them to the site.
  4. Give students time to create a television or social media advertisement that would entice potential visitors to visit this little-known tourist attraction over the summer.

ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to present their advertisements to the class. Encourage classmates to identify key elements in each ad that hooked their interest and made them want to visit specific sites.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
As a class, conduct research to identify a host of little-known tourist attractions. Then divide the class into small groups. Encourage each group to conduct research on its own to learn more about the site. Then have each group write a script for a 30-second television advertisement. Invite them to present their ads to the class. Compare and contrast the results.
Grades 5-6:
Divide the class into small groups. Encourage each group to conduct research to identify and learn about an interesting but little-known tourist attraction somewhere in the U.S. Once their research is done, give groups time to write and act out two different 30-second television advertisements for their site. Invite them to present their ads to the class. Have classmates compare the advertisements and discuss how each one captured their interest in a different way.
Grades 7-8:
Divide the class into small groups. Encourage each group to conduct research to identify and learn about an interesting but little-known tourist attraction somewhere in the world. Once their research is complete, give groups time to create a social media advertisement about to their site. Invite them to present their advertisement to the class. Have classmates summarize what the ad reveals about the site and discuss whether or not it hooked their interest enough for them to want to make the trip.
Grades 9-10:
Divide the class into pairs. Encourage partners to conduct research to identify and learn about an interesting but little-known tourist attraction somewhere in the world. Once their research is complete, instruct partners to create both a television advertisement and a social media advertisement about their site. Invite them to present their work to the class. Have classmates compare and contrast the ads and discuss how they work together to reach the target audience in multiple ways.
SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
1930s and 1940s Highway Classroom Activity Guide
Highways and roads are an integral part of many summer vacations. In these classroom activities, developed for the National Museum of American History exhibition America on the Move, students will use visual, analytical and interpretive skills to examine primary sources including a historical map and photography by Dorthea Lange and answer questions about them to investigate road travel and the role of highways played in the 1930s.

A Deep Dive into the Plans to Take Tourists to the Titanic
Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn about a daredevil inventor who—for a handsome price—will bring you aboard his groundbreaking submarine to put eyes on the most famous shipwreck of all.

How Alcatraz Has Changed Throughout History
Alcatraz has gone from a ‘place of evil spirits’ in native American lore, to a military prison, to a federal lockup. Today, it’s a tourist attraction that draws people from across the globe. Watch this Smithsonian Channel video to learn more about Alcatraz, an unlikely tourist attraction.

Indonesian Village Turns into a Rainbow to Attract Tourists
Every house and business in Kampung Pelangi is painted in bright rainbow colors. Read this Smithsonian magazine article to see the structures for yourself and to learn about the impact this project has had on the village.

Smithsonian’s Nature of Science: Expedition to Arctic Volcanoes
Some sites are little-known and visited because they are remote. Others because they are dangerous. And some, like the active volcanoes of Alaska’s Western Aleutian Islands, are both. Invite students to join geologist Dr. Elizabeth Cottrell in this video from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History as she explores these active Arctic volcanoes, searching for evidence of how the continents formed.

How Tombstone, Arizona Found New Life as a Tourist Attraction
The town of Tombstone, Arizona is cemented in wild west history, thanks to the legendary Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Years later, this epic event would be re-enacted for tourists—in the exact spot where it happened. Watch this Smithsonian Channel video to learn how that came to be.

Why Does Every Tourist Attraction Sell Fudge?
One thing that places as different as Niagara Falls, Disneyland and Ellis Island have in common is fudge. Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn why.
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