Teacher Sign Up
Sign In
Monday Morning Ready09.28.2018
Jumpstart Your Week!

If you’ve ever struggled to figure out where to live and work, you might benefit from Teleport, a website and app that recommends cities based on your lifestyle.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

What are the three best things about your town? What are the three worst?

Grade 5-6

How would you describe the town where you live to someone who was thinking about moving there?

Grade 7-8

Imagine that your family was moving. What are three things you would want to have in your new hometown? Now imagine that you are grown up and have a family of your own. You are moving. Do you think you will value the same things? Why or why not?

Grade 9-10

What financial issues would you need to take into account before moving overseas? What else would you need to consider? Under which circumstances would you be willing to make this life-changing transition? And what would convince you that it was better to stay put?

LESSON PLAN
Create a Monthly Budget

PROCESS:

  1. As a class, discuss what a monthly budget is and how it can be helpful. Discuss reasons why a monthly budget can also be difficult to follow.
  2. Have students create a list of items that should be included in a monthly budget. Then have them conduct research to identify a reasonable amount to allocate for each item in your area or in a place they want to live in the future. If you like, invite them to use the Teleport app featured in the article as inspiration.
  3. Assign monthly salaries or have students conduct research to identify the average salary of a career they hope to someday pursue.
  4. Challenge students to use the data they collected to create a reasonable monthly budget.

ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to present their budgets to the class. Encourage them to identify places where they splurged and places where they cut back so they could afford to live within their budget.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
Complete the activity as a class. Have students brainstorm a complete list of monthly expenses. Then work together to create a reasonable budget for a family of four living in your area. If you like, have the class create budgets for families with different monthly incomes. Then compare and contrast the results.
Grades 5-6:
Divide the class into small groups. Instruct each group to brainstorm a complete list of monthly expenses. Assign each group a different monthly income. Then have each group create a reasonable monthly budget for a family of four living in your area.
Grades 7-8:
Divide the class into pairs. Have partners brainstorm a complete list of monthly expenses. Then have them conduct research to identify a reasonable amount to allocate for each item in a place they would both like to live. Invite each partner to select a future career and conduct research to identify the average salary for that career in the location they chose. Based on that income, encourage each partner to adjust the monthly budget as needed so they can easily live within their means.
Grades 9-10:
As a class, brainstorm a complete list of monthly expenses. Then have students pick a place they'd like to live and a career they'd like to have in the future. Instruct students to conduct research to identify their average salary and a reasonable amount to allocate for each expense. Encourage students to use that data to create a monthly budget. Then, with the numbers before them, challenge students to make life decisions-such as number of children and type and location of home-that will help them live within their means.
SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
Gilded Age
Is greed good? That is the question students will explore with this Smithsonian History Explorer lesson. The inquiry investigates the impact—both good and bad—of the Industrial Age, which was essential to the economic and social development of the United States.

What Is Currency? Lessons from Historic Africa
Introduce students to economics with these lessons from the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access that focus on the currency system of the Akan people of Ghana in West Africa.

Revolutionary Money
These lessons from the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access present images of paper money from the American Revolution. Students examine the money in order to gather primary source information the Revolutionary period in general and the specific times when the bills were issued.

Global Legends
This interactive exhibit from the National Museum of American History invites students to explore legendary gold coins that represent the passionate quest for gold in the American frontier. Students will learn how the discovery of gold affected American ideas about the creation and use of money.

Lost in the Coin Vault
This interactive game from the National Museum of American History is a fun way to learn about currency and explore American history. Players enhance their analytical skills as they decipher clues and closely examine objects from the National Numismatics Collection. Their goal is twofold: solve mysteries and escape from the vault!

The Artistry of African Currency
Use this National Museum of African Art site to introduce students to objects that are used to facilitate trade for goods and to measure wealth in African cultures.

The Economics of Chocolate
Before becoming a kiss, bar or hot drink, cocoa gets shipped, stashed, smashed and—most critically for producers and consumers alike—commodified. Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn more.
ALSO ON TEENTRIBUNE.COM