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Monday Morning Ready09.06.2019
Jumpstart Your Week!

Food waste is a big deal: According to the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization, 28 percent of the world's agriculture area is used to produce food that ultimately goes to waste each year. But now, writes Feargus O'Sullivan for CityLab, a new supermarket stocked only with wasted food is tackling the problem head-on.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

How do you think grocery stores could cut down on food waste?

Grade 5-6

Do you think it would be practical or even possible to have a food waste grocery store in the United States? Why or why not?

Grade 7-8

What do you think about the supermarket's pay-as-you-can policy? What are the benefits? What are the drawbacks?

Grade 9-10

What do you think it would take to bring the food waste supermarket concept to the United States? Do you think it would be able to operate using the same pay-as-you-can method? Why or why not?

LESSON PLAN
Create or Support a Local Food Bank

PROCESS:

  1. As a class, discuss what a food bank is and how it provides food to hungry people.
  2. Invite a representative from a local food bank to visit the class so students can gain a better understanding of what food banks do. If there is no organization like this in your area, challenge students to identify a group that could help them start a food bank. Invite someone from that group to visit the class to explore how this could be done.
  3. Encourage students to identify the types of food most needed in your area. Challenge them to identify local sources where some of these foods could be collected and distributed to people in need. Possibilities include local restaurants, grocery stores, hospitals and even leftover food from the school cafeteria.
  4. Then, working in conjunction with the food bank representative, encourage students to brainstorm ideas for how to support the local food bank or create one of their own. Guide them as they work through details of how, when and where to collect food and how to best get it to the people who need it. Once the details are ironed out, put the plan into action.

ASSESSMENT:

After completing this activity, hold a class discussion to recap what happened. Encourage students to share ideas for improving the process.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
Organize the details yourself. Require each student to participate. Encourage each student to identify one thing he or she could do to help hungry people in your community.
Grades 5-6:
Invite students to help you identify the greatest food needs in your area and put the plan into action. Require each student to participate. Encourage each student to identify three things he or she could do to help hungry people in your area.
Grades 7-8:
Once you have identified a local organization to work with, divide the class into small groups. Assign each group a specific part of the project. Supervise as groups plan the step-by-step process for completing their tasks. You may wish to work with other classes to expand this into an all-school project. After students complete their work, encourage them to write an evaluation summarizing what they did and identifying additional ways they can help hungry people in your community.
Grades 9-10:
Once you have identified a local organization to work with, encourage students to select a team of supervisors. Each supervisor will oversee a specific part of the project. All other students will work in small groups to complete specific tasks. Encourage teams to outline the step-by-step process for completing their tasks so the overall project flows as seamlessly as possible. You may wish to invite other classes or expand this into an all-school project. Encourage students to enlist the help of parents, siblings and other community members as well. When the project is complete, encourage students to identify the biggest challenges and propose ideas for overcoming these challenges in the future.
SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
Canned Goods and Cucumber Seeds: Food Banks are Starting to Give Out Garden Starters
Read this Smithsonian Magazine article to learn why canned goods are taking a backseat to freshly grown produce at some food banks.

How Does Your Garden Grow?
In this lesson from the Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, students will create a new design for a school garden. Students will decide which plants will best grow in the local climate. They will identify how much sunlight the garden will receive and analyze how that affects their choice of plants. They will draw the proposed garden space.

How the U.S. Postal Service Could Tackle Food Insecurity
A team of Washington University students has a plan to tackle food insecurity. They want to use postal workers to pick up food, deliver it to food banks and even store it in post offices. Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn more about their plan.

Just a Few Species Make Up Most of Earth’s Food Supply. And That’s a Problem
The looming threat of extinction from climate change makes the lack of diversity in the world’s food supplies a dangerous prospect. Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn why.

Digging It—A Garden, That Is
In this teacher-created lesson from the Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, students design a community garden to benefit the hungry in the community.

Where Will Our Future Food Come From? Ask a Farmer
Read this Smithsonian article to get different viewpoints from two farmers as they discuss organic farming, GMOs and farm technology.

SOIL, Design A CSA/Food Market
In this lesson, students design a system of community-supported agriculture (CSA). The lesson includes such math applications as measurement and geometry.
ALSO ON TEENTRIBUNE.COM