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Monday Morning Ready12.07.2018
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From a distance, Muntanya de Sal looks like any other mountain. But once at its base, it’s apparent that it’s completely different from any other peak in Europe. Unlike other outcroppings piercing through the rolling landscape, Muntanya de Sal is made of salt.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Imagine that you could create a mountain out of something unusual and place it near where you live. What material would you use to create the mountain? Why?

Grade 5-6

Why do you think salt has been so valuable at certain times in history that people used it as currency and called it "the white gold?"

Grade 7-8

Based on what you know about the formation of mountains, how is Muntanya de Sal like other mountains? How is it different?

Grade 9-10

Why do you think people stopped mining at Muntanya de Sal and turned into a cultural park? What would you do with an unusual mountain like this?

LESSON PLAN
Show and Tell About a Mountain

PROCESS:

  1. As a class, brainstorm a list of mountains around the world. Invite students who have seen any of these mountains in real life to describe what the mountains were like. Encourage them to also share anything they know about how the mountains were formed.
  2. Select one mountain prior to conducting this activity or encourage students to select their own. Then have students conduct research to learn more about the mountain they are investigating.
  3. Instruct students to write a brief scientific paper about their mountain. Challenge them to describe in detail what the mountain looks like and how it was formed.
  4. Provide a variety of art supplies. Give students time to draw a picture or create a 3-D model of their mountain. Challenge them to be as accurate as possible.

ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to present their artwork and papers to the class. As they do, encourage them to point out important connections between the mountain's appearance and how it was formed.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
Prior to conducting this activity, select one mountain for the class to investigate. Provide assistance as students conduct research. Work together as a class to write a scientific paper describing what the mountain looks like and how it was formed. Then provide paper and crayons and have each student draw a picture of the mountain.
Grades 5-6:
Prior to conducting this activity, gather a variety of supplies so students can create 3-D models of a mountain. Divide the class into small groups. Have each group select a mountain, conduct research and write a brief scientific paper describing the mountain's appearance and how it was formed. Then have group members work together to create a 3-D model of their mountain.
Grades 7-8:
Prior to conducting this activity, gather a variety of supplies so students can draw pictures or create 3-D models of a mountain. Assign each student a partner. Have each pair select a mountain, conduct research and write a brief scientific paper describing the mountain's appearance and how it was formed. Then have partners work together to draw a picture or create a 3-D model of their mountain.
Grades 9-10:
Prior to conducting this activity, gather a variety of supplies so students can create 3-D models of a mountain. Encourage each student to select a mountain, conduct research and write a brief scientific paper describing the mountain's appearance and how it was formed. Give students time to create a 3-D model of their mountain. In their model, challenge students to include details that show how the mountain's geography encourages people to use the mountain in certain ways. For example, students might include people skiing down the sides of a mountain that is frequently covered in snow.
SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
If We’re Going to Climb Mountains, First the Earth Needs to Make Them
It takes time—lots of time—to make a mountain. Watch the video in this Smithsonian magazine article to explore the processes that affect mountain evolution.

The Views of the Olympic Mountains Are Truly Godlike
In 1788, a British mariner passed by the majestic, snow-covered mountains of northwest Washington. The peaks seemed the perfect dwelling place for Greek gods, so he named them the Olympic Mountains. Watch this Smithsonian Channel video to learn more about this mountain chain.

The Wilderness Road
In 1775, the now-legendary frontiersman Daniel Boone blazed a trail through the Cumberland Gap—a notch in the Appalachian Mountains located near the intersection of Kentucky, Virginia and Tennessee. The trail, known as the Wilderness Road, then passed through the interior of Kentucky and to the Ohio River. Use this collection materials from the Smithsonian Learning Lab to learn more about Boone’s pioneering path.

This Account is Reclaiming the Indigenous Names for Mountains One Geotag at a Time
Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn about the Navajo climber who is leading a social media campaign to spread awareness of the indigenous names of peaks.

Interview with Sir Edmund Hillary: Mountain Climbing
On May 29, 1953, Edmund Hillary scaled the peak of Mount Everest, becoming an instant celebrity. Invite students to listen to these snippets from a Smithsonian Folkways interview with Hillary to learn more about this great mountaineer and his expeditions.

The Tallest Mountains in the Solar System
Read this Smithsonian Magazine article to learn why Mount Everest is just a peewee when compared with such giants as Mount Olympus on Mars.

Tengir-too: Mountain Music of Kyrgyzstan
From the mountainous Kyrgyzstan, Jew’s harps, fiddles, plucked stringed instruments and powerful voices transmit the vibrant rhythms of nomadism and the serene atmosphere of the Kyrgyz mountains. Watch this video from the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage to see and hear musicians perform in this musical language, which as contemporary as it is ancient.
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