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Monday Morning Ready02.07.2019
Jumpstart Your Week!

Global Breakfast Radio is a 24-hour broadcast operation, aggregating programs from more than 250 radio stations around the world. But there's a catch: Each of those stations is only played during its time zone's respective breakfast time slot.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

What would you name a radio station that only broadcast at sunrise? Why would you choose that name?

Grade 5-6

Why do you think the founders of Global Breakfast Radio decided to center their broadcast around breakfast instead of some other time of day? What time of day would you have picked? Why?

Grade 7-8

According to the article, Global Breakfast Radio plays traditional songs that are representative of the tremendous diversity around the globe. If your local radio station were part of this network, what song do you think it should play to represent the culture in your area? Why?

Grade 9-10

Imagine that you were the advertising director for Global Breakfast Radio. How would you promote the station to attract listeners around the globe?

LESSON PLAN
Create a Radio Show

PROCESS:

  1. As a class, identify the many different types of radio shows offered on the air (documentary, music, talk show, etc.). Identify the purpose of each (inform, entertain, persuade). Discuss how the content of a radio show, such as comedy vs. news or the many different genres of music, influences the type of listener a radio show will attract.
  2. Inform students that they are going to create their own radio show. Encourage students to select the type of show they would like to create.
  3. Give students time to listen to a variety of radio shows in their selected genre. What did they like? What would they change? How could they create a new show in that genre that is unique?
  4. Instruct students to brainstorm ideas for their new radio show. Students should identify the type of audience they want to attract and select a purpose and format (interviews, music, live callers, infomercials, etc.) that will help them achieve that goal.
  5. Give students time to create a schedule outlining one hour for air time on their new radio show. Have older students write and present a script for the first five minutes of their show.

ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to share their outlines with the class. Encourage classmates to evaluate ways in which the radio show's content and format are designed to attract a specific audience.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
Divide the class into small groups. Encourage each group to select the type of radio show it would like to create and the type of audience it wants to attract. Give students time to brainstorm ideas. Depending on the type of show students pursue, challenge them to identify details such as which songs they will play, who they will interview, or the types of commercials they will air.
Grades 5-6:
Divide the class into small groups. Encourage each group to select the type of radio show it would like to create and the type of audience it wants to attract. Give students time to brainstorm ideas. Then challenge each group to create an outline that is exactly one hour long. To do this, students should know the length of each song they play, interview they hold, or commercial they play.
Grades 7-8:
Divide the class into small groups. Encourage each group to select the type of radio show it would like to create and the type of audience it wants to attract. Give students time to brainstorm ideas. Encourage groups to create a detailed outline for their one-hour show, identifying each song they will play, person they will interview, etc. Then have groups write a word-for-word script for the first five minutes of their broadcast. Invite groups to read their scripts aloud or play previously recorded versions for their classmates.
Grades 9-10:
Divide the class into small groups. Encourage each group to select the type of radio show it would like to create and the type of audience it wants to attract. Inform groups that their shows will air live. No content will be pre-recorded. With that in mind, give students time to brainstorm ideas for their show. Encourage groups to create an overall outline, identifying each song they will play, person they will interview, time they will spend with live callers, etc. Instruct them to also write a basic outline of what they would like to say. Give each group five minutes to present their live programs to the class.
SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
New Kid on the Block
In this activity from the Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, students will consider what it is like to be a new student in their school. They will interview students who transferred into the school last year to learn about their experiences as incoming students and create materials or a program to help new students with their transition into the school.

“Hello, America!” Radio Broadcasting in the Years Before Television
This 1986 issue of Art to Zoo, presented by the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, introduces the golden Age of Radio. Students write and produce their own radio shows and perform them for the class.

How Radio Changed America
The technology for radio communications advanced during World War I, but it wasn’t until the 1920s that commercial broadcasting grew and everyone wanted a radio in their home. Radio had a huge impact on creating a “mass media” that bound together the nation. As students explore this Smithsonian Learning Lab collection, they will look for evidence proving how radio changed America in respect to politics, entertainment and sports, religion and advertising.

Radio Activity: The 100th Anniversary of Public Broadcasting
Since its inception, public radio has had a crucial role in broadcasting history—from FDR’s “Fireside Chats” to the Internet Age. Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn all about it.

Brown v. Board of Education: Five Communities Change a Nation
In this classroom lesson from the National Museum of American History, students will research to gather information in order to create a radio broadcast about the five court cases that made up Brown v. Board of Education. Students will tell the stories of the African Americans from different walks of life who demanded better educational opportunities for their children.

Music on the Radio
In celebration of the original tech platform for music discovery, explore a selection of radios from across the Smithsonian

The Infamous “War of the Worlds” Radio Broadcast Was a Magnificent Fluke
Orson Welles and his colleagues scrambled to pull together the show; they ended up writing pop culture history. Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn how.
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