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Monday Morning Ready10.27.2017
Jumpstart Your Week!

The hot dog is a classic American food. It is connected to Coney Island. Coney Island is America's most storied amusement resort. Hot dogs have been connected to Coney Island since frankfurter first met bun. Nathan's century-old triumph of entrepreneurship is only part of the Ellis-Island-meets-Coney-Island story.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Do you like hot dogs? If so, what’s your favorite topping?

Grade 5-6

Do you think hot dogs are as popular today as they were in the 1920s? Why or why not?

Grade 7-8

Why do you think there are so many different versions of hot dogs? Why do you think they have so many different names for the same kind of food?

Grade 9-10

Today, hot dogs are the kind of food people serve at picnics and barbecues. Why do you think President Franklin D. Roosevelt thought they were an appropriate food to serve to the Queen of England in 1936?

LESSON PLAN
Create a Multicultural Cookbook

PROCESS:

  1. As a class, review the article to examine the origins of hot dogs. Discuss how something invented and revised by various European immigrants has come to be recognized as a quintessential American food.
  2. Point out that hot dogs are not an isolated example. Many, if not most, of the foods they eat likely originated in other countries. After all, people have been eating for far longer than the United States has existed as a country. And, the typical American diet includes foods that come from many different cultures.
  3. Have students investigate the origins of a food they like to eat. Instruct them to find a recipe as well as detailed information about the food's history.
  4. Instruct students to compile the information they collected to create an informational page about each food. Encourage them to include photos, drawings and maps that help tell their foods' stories. Remind them not to forget to include the recipe.
  5. Combine students' work to create a multicultural cookbook for the class.

ASSESSMENT: 

Make copies of the finished cookbook. Give each student a copy to take home. If possible, encourage students to make their foods at home. Invite them to share their dishes in a class potluck meal. After the feast, invite students to share what they learned about the origins of their food. As a class, discuss how a history of immigration has helped shaped what Americans eat. 

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON: 

Grades 3-4:
Poll the class to identify students' five favorite foods. Divide the class into five groups. Have each group find a recipe and learn about the history of one of the selected foods. Encourage each group to create an informational page about its assigned food. Compile the pages to create a multicultural cookbook. 
Grades 5-6:
Divide the class into small groups. Instruct each group to select three favorite foods. Monitor students' choices to make sure there are no repeats. Encourage them to investigate to find a recipe and learn about the history of each food. Then have groups create an informational page about each food. Compile the pages to create a multicultural cookbook. As you review the recipes, challenge students to identify the cultural roots of each type of food.
Grades 7-8: 
Divide the class into pairs. Instruct each partner to each identify his or her favorite food. Monitor students' choices to make sure there are no repeats. Encourage them to investigate to find a recipe and learn about the history of each food. Have pairs create an informational page about each food. Compile the pages to create a multicultural cookbook. As you review the recipes, challenge the class to identify where in the world most of students' favorite foods originated.
Grades 9-10:
Have students identify their favorite foods. Post a list of all selections. Then give the class time to investigate so they can find recipes and learn about the history of their selected foods. If any students are researching the same food, tell them to compare notes. They must have different recipes. Encourage each student to create an informational page about his or her food. Compile the pages to create a multicultural cookbook. As you review the recipes, challenge the class to identify the countries and cultures that had the biggest impact on what and how Americans eat.
SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
Second Opinion: Immigration Education Resources
These resources, compiled by the education teams across the Smithsonian Institution, feature lessons, activities, exhibitions, videos and tools that can be used to teach students about immigration and “What It Means to Be an American Today.”

What It Means to Be American
In 2014, the National Museum of American History launched a three-year project. The goal: to visit homes and communities across the United States to hear people’s stories. What are their interests and values? How do their experiences and opportunities define how people from all walks of life come together as Americans? Visit this site to explore the results of those conversations.

U.S. Immigration Policy
In this History Explorer inquiry, high school students will develop their thinking in terms of continuity and change as they learn about U.S. immigration policy actions and their effects over time.

Immigration to America
This collection, compiled by the Smithsonian Learning Lab, provides an overview of immigration to the United States, emphasizing the increased immigration during the Gilded Age. As students complete the collection on their own, they will focus on immigrants’ motivations, the challenges they faced and the contributions they made to American society.

Immigration
Use these resources from the National Museum of American History to explore immigration with your students. Lessons include examination of maps, artifacts and exhibits as well as an electronic field trip.

This Jigsaw Puzzle Was Given to Ellis Island Immigrants to Test Their Intelligence
Read this Smithsonian article to learn how a confusing set of blocks sometimes sealed the fate of people who immigrated to the United States in the early 20th century.

Migrations in History
Encourage students to explore the nature and complexity of the movement of people, cultures, ideas and objects with this site from the Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies. Through stories and artifacts, students will learn what happens when people move, what they take with them, what they leave behind and how they make their new place home.

The Statue of Liberty Was Once Patented
The Statue of Liberty was designed to be a beautiful and poetic representation of Liberty enlightening the world. Read this Smithsonian article to learn how this beacon of hope for new immigrants came to be. Then poll the class: Do students think the Statue of Liberty is still a shining symbol of liberty and freedom? Why or why not?

Did Ellis Island Officials Really Change the Names of Immigrants?
Ellis Island, the nation’s first federal immigration station, opened in New York Harbor more than 125 years ago. Read this Smithsonian article to learn about facts and myths associated with the historic landmark.
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