Teacher Sign Up
Sign In
Monday Morning Ready01.26.2017
Jumpstart Your Week!

"When I was a little girl," says Chanell Kelton, "I used to tell my friends that my house is one of the oldest houses in Maryland." In fact, the two-story home where Kelton took her very first steps was built around 1875. It was the first house built in what became the free African-American community of Jonesville. It's in rural Montgomery County. ... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Do you think the "Freedom House" is an important artifact to include in the National Museum of African American History and Culture? Why or why not?

Grade 5-6

According to the article, a network of black communities emerged in the post-emancipation era. Why do you think this happened? How do you think it helped the newly freed people survive?

Grade 7-8

In the article, Paul Gardullo, curator for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, says the "Freedom House" evokes the aspirations as well as the limitations of the era following enslavement. Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Why?

Grade 9-10

According to Paul Gardullo, curator for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the stereotypical story of African American history goes from slavery to sharecropping to the urban ghetto. He sees the "Freedom House" as a symbol of how African American history is more complicated than that. Do you agree with Gardullo that this stereotype exists? If so, how can artifacts like the "Freedom House" help people understand the complex history of the African American culture?

LESSON PLAN
Showcase Your Family Pride

PROCESS:

  1. Have students read the article, "For nearly 150 years, this house told a story about the African American experience."
  2. After reading, instruct students to write three statements explaining what the "Freedom House" meant to the families that lived there. Responses might relate to safety, community or family history. Challenge students to explain why each of these connections is important.
  3. Have students examine the objects featured in the Smithsonian Learning Lab "Family Pride." Encourage them to select items that remind them of the values, connections or traditions that are important to their own families. If something important is missing, encourage students to provide or draw a picture of their own. Students may also choose to explore the collections of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture to find a relatable object.
  4. Have students incorporate the items into an essay or exhibition about their own families. Challenge them to use the items in a way that shows and tells what their family is proud of.

ASSESSMENT: 

Invite students to share their essays or exhibitions with the class. After all students have presented, challenge the class to identify similarities in the presentations. What values, connections or traditions most often lead to a sense of family pride?

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:     

Grades 3-4:
Read and discuss the article as a class. View the "Family Pride" collection as a class, too. Encourage students to explain what each image shows. Discuss different ways the items could represent important values, connections or traditions in their own families. Then have students each select one item from the site or draw a picture of their own. Instruct them to write a brief essay explaining why that item makes their family proud. 

Grades 5-6:
Read and discuss the article as a class. Then have students view the "Family Pride" collection in small groups. Encourage groups to examine the images and think about different ways the items shown could represent the values, connections or traditions that are important to their own families. Invite groups to share their ideas with the class. Then have students each write a brief essay explaining what makes their own families proud. Encourage them to incorporate details related to two or more items from the site or drawings they created on their own.

Grades 7-8:
Have students read the article on their own. Then have them discuss the article and view the "Family Pride" collection in small groups. As they view the collection, encourage students to discuss different ways the objects could represent the values, connections or traditions that are important to their own families. Invite groups to share their ideas with the class. Then have each student compile a collection of 10 or more pictures that illustrate what makes his or her own family proud. Students may print photos from the collection or provide photos or drawings of their own. Instruct students to write a detailed caption for each image, explaining what the item is and why it is a source of family pride.

Grades 9-10:
Have students read the article on their own. Then have them discuss the article and view the "Family Pride" collection in small groups. As they view the collection, tell groups to tap the information tab to learn more about each resource. Encourage students to identify different ways the objects depicted could represent the values, connections or traditions that are important to their own families. Then have each student select, provide or create 10 or more pictures that illustrate what makes his or her own family proud. Instruct students to write a detailed caption for each image, explaining what the item is and why it is a source of family pride. Challenge them to compile the information into a digital collection.

SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
Black History Teaching Resources
Explore this Smithsonian Education site for a variety of teaching resources relate to Black History Month.

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Invite students to learn more about the African American experience through the collections, exhibitions and stories found at the Smithsonian’s newest museum.

Breaking Ground
This link leads you to a variety of Smithsonian articles related to the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Articles cover everything from an interactive tour of the museum to the definitive story of how the museum came to be.

An Organized Legal Campaign-Lesson
In this lesson plan from the National Museum of American History students create posters to convey the importance of specific figures in the legal battle to end segregation. The lesson is part of the online exhibition, “Separate is Not Equal: Brown v. Board of Education.”

The Enduring Emancipation: From President Lincoln to President Obama
In this nearly two-hour webinar, Lonnie Bunch, founding director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, discusses the Emancipation Proclamation and its legacy.

Mutiny on the Amistad
Read this Smithsonian article to learn about the 1839 revolt in which African freemen, seized as slaves, struck a daring blow for freedom.
ALSO ON TEENTRIBUNE.COM