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Monday Morning Ready04.25.2019
Jumpstart Your Week!

Oahu, Hawai'i, 1877. Queen Lili`uokalani, the last monarch of the Hawaiian Islands, prepared her party to leave for Honolulu after spending time at the country ranch of Col. James Harbottle Boyd. As she mounted her horse and looked back to ensure everyone was ready, she saw Boyd pull one of her friends into a tender embrace.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Make a list of everything that comes to mind when you think about Hawai`i. What do these things tell you about Hawaiian culture?

Grade 5-6

Do you think Queen Lili`uokalani's songs would have had such lasting popularity if they had not blended Hawaiian culture and traditions with Western styles of music? Why or why not?

Grade 7-8

Based on what you read in the article, do you think Queen Lili`uokalani's music is more valuable as an example of Hawaiian culture or as a source on Hawaiian history? Why?

Grade 9-10

According to the article, Hawai`i's Queen Lili`uokalani lived, led, and modeled the sense of "aloha" for her people. What does this mean? How did it contribute to Hawai`i's loss of sovereignty and the decades of cultural oppression that followed? And how can it help Hawaiians reclaim their culture today?

LESSON PLAN
Explore Asian American and Pacific Islander Cultures

PROCESS:

  1. Invite students to identify and share what they know about various Asian American and Pacific Islander cultures. If you wish, display this graphic from the United States Census Bureau to appreciate the diversity of Asian and Pacific Islander populations in the United States.
  2. Have students select one Asian American or Pacific Islander population. Give them time to conduct research to learn more about its culture and traditions. Then instruct students to select one aspect-such as music, a form of writing, a sport, a food, clothing, etc.-that is particularly important in the culture they chose.
  3. Encourage students to choose an appropriate method to share that part of the culture with the class. For example, they might find sheet music and perform a traditional song, host a fashion show or find or create examples of artwork to create a cultural art exhibit. Provide a variety of art supplies and other materials needed to complete their projects.

ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to share their work with the class. Encourage classmates to discuss what each presentation reveals about the culture it represents.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
As a class, conduct research to learn more about the culture and traditions of Hawai`i. Then divide the class into small groups. Assign each group one topic that is particularly important in the Hawaiian culture. Encourage groups to brainstorm ideas for how to best represent this part of Hawaiian culture to the class. Provide supplies and give groups time to complete their projects.
Grades 5-6:
Have students complete the activity in small groups. Assign each group one Asian American or Pacific Islander population. Have students conduct research to learn more about their assigned cultures. Challenge them to identify one item or tradition that is particularly important in their culture. Then give groups time brainstorm ideas and create an example. Invite one member from each group to present their ideas to the class.
Grades 7-8:
Have students complete the activity in small groups. Encourage each group to select one Asian American or Pacific Islander population and identify one item or tradition that is particularly important in that culture. Make sure there are no repeats. Then instruct groups to brainstorm ideas about how to give each group member an active role as they introduce this part of the culture to the class. Give groups time to complete their projects.
Grades 9-10:
Divide the class into pairs. Instruct each pair to select one Asian American or Pacific Islander population and conduct research to learn more about it. Make sure there are no repeats. Have partners select one item or tradition that is particularly important to their culture. Then give pairs time to brainstorm ideas and create multiple examples for their cultural presentations.
SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is a migratory museum that brings history, art and culture to you through innovative community-focused experiences. Invite students to learn more about Asian Pacific American cultures as they explore the center’s exhibits, labs and projects.

Creating Hawai`i
In this Smithsonian Education lesson, students of all ages can learn about the state’s history and culture by exploring the Smithsonian Exhibition, Creating Hawai`i. Younger students organize the exhibition into categories. Older students look at Census Bureau statistics and develop theories of why Hawaii is “the most ethnically diverse state in the nation.”

Island Soundscape: Musics of Hawaii, the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea
Use this lesson from the Smithsonian Folkways Recordings to help students discover the island cultures of the South Pacific and their musical expressions with songs, crafts and games.

Asian Pacific American
Explore Asian Pacific American Heritage Month with your students using these lessons, podcasts, activities and primary resources form the Smithsonian’s History Explorer.

How the First Asian American Marine Officer Overcame Racism
As a lieutenant, Chew-Een Lee faced an uncommon obstacle, his men had never before seen an Asian Marine. Watch this Smithsonian Channel video to hear his story.

Flashcard Activity: Asian Pacific American Resources
This collection from the Smithsonian Learning Lab contains a diverse set of resources related to Asian Pacific Americans. The items, which can be printed as flashcards, could be used as an introductory activity to spark discussion and prompt students to conduct research about how Asian Pacific American history is American history.

Pacific Islander Songs, Sounds and Signals: Musics of Samoa, Fiji and Tonga
Use this lesson from Smithsonian Folkways Recordings to help students explore the music of the Pacific islands of Samoa, Fiji and Tonga, including their instruments and cultural similarities. Students will identify types of instruments used to create the music, notate basic rhythms and melodic contour and compare the music among the three cultures.

Finding Lessons on Culture and Conservation at the End of the Road in Kauai
In the remote, tropical paradise called Ha`ena, the community is reasserting Native Hawaiian stewardship of the land and sea. Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn how.
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