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Monday Morning Ready10.12.2018
Jumpstart Your Week!

To anyone who’s ever seen a Green Bay Packers game, the headwear of choice for many such fans should be immediately recognizable: a huge foam wedge of cheese. And though the hats aren’t made in Green Bay (in fact, the company that makes them, Foamation, isn’t affiliated with the Packers at all), they are made in Wisconsin. Now, with a set of recently launched factory tours, you can visit cheese headquarters in Milwaukee and make your own.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Do you think it would be fun to tour Foamation’s cheese headquarters in Milwaukee? Why or why not?

Grade 5-6

Have you ever been on a factory tour before? If so, what was it like? If not, what kind of factory do you think would be fun to tour?

Grade 7-8

What do you think is the most interesting part of the Cheesehead story: why it started, how it started or the fact that it’s still going?

Grade 9-10

If you could design a foam hat for your school’s mascot, what would it look like? How would you make it unique?

LESSON PLAN
Plan a Field Trip

PROCESS:

  1. As a class, create a list of items to consider when planning a field trip. If necessary, remind students to include essentials such as funding, transportation, permissions, chaperones, etc.
  2. Have students brainstorm a list of places in your area that would be fun to visit. If any of these places offer tours, what do those tours include?
  3. Ask students think of ways that one or more of these places could tie into what they are learning, what they will be learning or what they hope to learn about this year.
  4. Instruct students to write a proposal and create an itinerary for a local field trip that has a direct link to your curriculum.

ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to share their proposals and itineraries with the class. Challenge them to summarize what they would learn and why the field trip would be a valuable addition to their education.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3–4:
As a class, select one location that would be interesting to visit on a field trip. Divide the class into small groups. Instruct each group to investigate one aspect of the field trip, such as funding, transportation, permissions, chaperones, or what they would see, learn and do if they visited this place. Work together as a class to write a proposal and create an itinerary for a field trip to that place.
Grades 5–6:
As a class, identify essential elements of planning a field trip and a create list of locations the class could visit to learn more about what they are studying. Then divide the class into small groups. Instruct each group to pick one location, write a proposal and create an itinerary for a field trip to that place.
Grades 7–8:
As a class, identify essential elements of planning a field trip. Then divide the class into small groups. Instruct groups to brainstorm a list of local places they could visit that would add to what they are or hope to study this year. Then have each group pick two places on their list, write a proposal and create an itinerary for a field trip that visits each place.
Grades 9–10:
Assign each student a partner. Instruct partners to identify essential elements of planning a field trip. Then have them brainstorm a list of local places they could visit that have a connection to what they are or hope to study this year. Instruct partners to pick two places that address different aspects of the same topic. Challenge them to write a proposal and create an itinerary for a field trip that gives a balanced view of the subject and emphasizes its connection to your community.
SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
A Family Visit to the Smithsonian
Invite students to explore this interactive site from the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, which features one family’s weeklong experience visiting Smithsonian museums and exhibits. The site features the family’s journal entries and activities they created to help make the most of a visit to Washington, D.C.

What’s Tops at the National Air and Space Museum?
Invite students to examine this National Air and Space Museum brochure, which helps visitors conduct their own self-guided tour. The brochure explores four aircraft and two spacecraft and encourages students to vote for their favorite at the visit’s conclusion. It also includes a gallery map.

Mission to Mars
Are you ready for the ultimate field trip? First, you have to figure out how to survive the trip! In this teacher-created lesson from the Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, students use what they’ve learned about body systems (circulatory, digestive, skeletal/muscular, cardiovascular and nervous) to design a product that will help astronauts travel to Mars.

Honeybees are the Stars at New York City’s Coolest Field Trip
Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn why people are buzzing about the world’s largest rooftop soil farm.

Telling a Painting’s Story
If you’re planning to visit an art museum, use this activity from the Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies to teach students how to express their opinions about art as they write essays inspired by paintings they observe.

Hometown History
Use this National Museum of American History activity as a guide to take students on an elementary field trip to a fort or other historic site. After reading “The Flag Maker,” students will visit a historic fort and use guiding observation questions to connect their experience to the events that inspired the National Anthem at Fort McHenry during the War of 1812. The lesson is adaptable to other historic locations.

Take a Trip to Glacier National Park
Watch this Smithsonian Channel video to experience Glacier National Park’s awe-inspiring peaks, untouched forests, pristine alpine meadows and breathtaking lakes.
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