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Monday Morning Ready03.10.2017
Jumpstart Your Week!

Has a Girl Scout knocked on your door within the last few weeks? Cookie season is in full swing. So it's not unusual to see scouts on the move in neighborhoods and set up in front of supermarkets selling their delicious wares. But for one group of girls, cookie sales and badges weren't always a possibility.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Why do you think the Girl Scouts declared itself a space for all girls in 1912 if African American girls weren't allowed to join?

Grade 5-6

In what ways do you think groups like the Girl Scouts empower girls to become strong, confident women?

Grade 7-8

According to the article, Juliette Gordon Low started the Girl Scouts because she was irritated by her rigid Southern upbringing and the strict expectations of upper-class women in the United States. Why do you think she thought starting the Girl Scouts was a good way to push back?

Grade 9-10

According to the article, Juliette Gordon Low didn't require Girl Scout troops to allow African American girls to join because she was afraid that Southern troops would quit. Instead, she allowed state and local councils to determine who could join. Do you think this was a good decision? Why or why not?

LESSON PLAN
Create a Student-Led Organization

PROCESS:

  1. Have students brainstorm ideas for a student-led organization in your school. Inform them that the group must be all-inclusive, but it can focus on any topic they choose.
  2. Have students focus on the details. How would they get other students to join? How would the organization be funded? What would they call the organization? And how would that name reflect their "brand." 
  3. Encourage students to design a fitting logo for their group. If group members will be required to wear uniforms, have them design those, too.
  4. Based on the information they have compiled, invite students to create a brochure that will entice fellow students to join their group.

ASSESSMENT: 

Have students share their brochures with the class. Check each brochure to ensure that students identified the group, displayed its logo prominently and answered vital questions potential members might have about the group.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:    

Grades 3-4:
As a class, brainstorm ideas for a new organization and come up with a name for the group. Then divide the class into small groups. Challenge each group to create a logo for the organization. Have them include the logo as they develop a brochure. Invite groups to share their brochures with the class. Have students identify elements in each brochure that would entice potential members to join the new group.

Grades 5-6:
As a class, brainstorm ideas for a new organization. Then divide the class into small groups. Challenge each group to come up with a name for the organization, create a logo and design uniforms for members. Then have them create a brochure. Invite groups to share their brochures with the class. Challenge groups to explain how their name, logo and uniform design reflect the organization's "brand." Encourage classmates to identify elements in each brochure that would entice them to join the new group.

Grades 7-8: 
Divide the class into small groups. Have groups brainstorm ideas for a new student-led organization. Instruct them to come up with a name, develop a logo and design uniforms for group members. Challenge them to also design other items related to the group such as badges or a flag. Then have them create a brochure. Invite groups to share their brochures with the class. Challenge them to explain how their name, logo, uniform and additional elements work together to reflect the organization's "brand." Encourage classmates to identify elements in each brochure that would entice them to join the new group.

Grades 9-10:
Divide the class into small groups. Have groups brainstorm ideas for a new student-led organization. Instruct them to come up with a name, develop a logo and design uniforms and other items related to the group such as badges or a flag. Then have them create a brochure. Invite groups to share their brochures with the class. Instruct them to explain how their name, logo, uniform and additional elements work together to reflect the organization's "brand." Challenge them to explain how their new group would meet an unmet need in the school, community or nation as a whole. 

SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
Collecting a Century of Girl Scouts
Invite students to read this article from the National Museum of American History to learn about the Smithsonian’s vast collection of Girl Scout memorabilia.

How One 138-Page Book Inspired the Creation of the Boy Scouts
Read this Smithsonian article to learn how a little military textbook evolved into a movement that would captivate generations of young men.

The Very First Troop Leader
Read this Smithsonian article to learn more about Juliette Gordon Low, founder of the Girl Scouts.

When Did the Girl Scouts Start Selling Cookies?
Read this Smithsonian article to learn when this Girl Scout annual ritual began and how the cookies have changed over the years.

Lesson of a Lifetime
Read this Smithsonian article to learn about the teacher whose bold experiment to teach Iowa third graders about racial prejudice divided townspeople and thrust her onto the national stage.

Expand Your Cultural Education
Are you looking to engage your students in hands-on activities or to stimulate research and discussion about folklore, cultural heritage and oral history? Look no further. Download lesson plans and learning guides, watch videos, order books and recordings, browse online exhibitions and link to the world of cultural heritage educational materials through the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.
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