Teacher Sign Up
Sign In
Monday Morning Ready03.08.2019
Jumpstart Your Week!

How safe is your data? Probably not as safe as you think: Everything from international cyber attacks to your smart refrigerator can put personal information, money and even your own safety at risk. But there is new help. As Catherine Thorbecke reported for ABC News, the world has a new cybercrime-fighting force: Girl Scouts.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

What do you think a cybersleuth is? How do you think you become one?

Grade 5-6

What do you want to do when you grow up? What are you learning now that could prepare you for that career?

Grade 7-8

What changes do you think should be made so it is possible for more women to enter and succeed in the cyber industry?

Grade 9-10

According to the article, 51 percent of women surveyed said they'd experienced everything from unexplained delays in advancement to tokenism or exaggerated highlighting of their mistakes, compared to just 15 percent of men. It is now the 21st century. Why do you think this type of discrimination is still happening? Do you think it will ever change? Why or why not?

LESSON PLAN
Design a New Merit Badge

PROCESS:

  1. Invite volunteers who are members of groups such as the Girl Scouts to explain what a merit badge is and how it is earned. Help students who are new to this concept understand that earning a merit badge is a process. Many steps are involved and each step must be mastered before the badge is complete.
  2. Have students brainstorm ideas for a new merit badge based on emerging ideas and innovations that could prepare them for up-and-coming careers in the future.
  3. Instruct students to write a list of requirements needed to earn the new badge. Then encourage them to draw a picture showing what the badge would look like.

ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to share their lists of requirements and badge prototypes with the class. Challenge students to explain how the tasks required to achieve the badge would prepare them for a career of the future.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
As a class, brainstorm a list of potential topics that could be studied to earn a new merit badge. Then divide the class into small groups. Encourage each group to select one topic from the list. Have group members work together to write a list of requirements and design their new badge.
Grades 5-6:
As a class, brainstorm a list of potential topics that could be studied to earn a new merit badge. Then divide the class into pairs. Encourage partners to select one topic from the list, write a list of requirements and design their new badge.
Grades 7-8:
Have students complete the activity in pairs. Instruct partners to select a topic for a new merit badge suitable for elementary students. Have them identify key goals for the badge and then write a list of five or more requirements students must master to achieve those goals. Then give partners time to design their new badge.
Grades 9-10:
Have students complete the activity in pairs. Instruct partners to select a topic for a new merit badge suitable for students their age. Have them identify key goals for the badge and then write a list of seven or more requirements students must master to achieve those goals. Then give partners time to design their new badge.
SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
The Very First Troop Leader
Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn the story of Juliette Gordon Low, founder of the Girl Scouts.

Setting the Precedent: Four Women Who Excelled in Business
This National Museum of American History website will introduce students to four American women who succeeded in business during the twentieth century. Students can read about their lives and accomplishments and learn about their careers through short biographies, timelines and interactive games.

Girl Scouts 100 and the Smithsonian
Visit this site to explore a variety of Smithsonian resources celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Girl Scouts.

Women and Science at Science Service
During the early 1920s, the not-for-profit news organization Science Service played an important role in the emerging field of science journalism. Invite students to review this Smithsonian Institution Archives exhibit to learn about the female staff members and contributing writers who were pioneers in that profession.

This is the First Detailed Public Map of the U.S. Internet Infrastructure
The location of major cables was once a secret, but now researchers hope knowledge of it will spark conversations on how to keep the system safe. Read this Smithsonian magazine article to learn how.

The Cyber Crimes You Never Hear About
Financial institutions go to great lengths to protect themselves against cyber attacks, but very little stops these elite hackers. Watch this Smithsonian Channel video to learn about one of the biggest cyber heists to understand why more people are needed to fight cyber crimes.
ALSO ON TEENTRIBUNE.COM