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Monday Morning Ready09.22.2017
Jumpstart Your Week!

Imagine coming down for breakfast. Instead of popping a piece of toast in the toaster and boiling an egg, you stick a cartridge in a printer. You wait a minute or two. Then you’ve got a freshly printed banana and flaxseed muffin. The printed breakfast is several steps closer to reality for the average consumer.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

If you could use a 3D food printer to make any meal, what would it be? What kinds of ingredients would it contain?

Grade 5-6

What do you think would be the biggest advantage of using a 3D food printer? What, if any, disadvantages can you think of?

Grade 7-8

How do you think the food industry-including farms, manufacturers, grocery stores and restaurants-would change if 3D food printing became common practice?

Grade 9-10

In the article, Hod Lipson, who led the creation of the new 3D food printer, identified two main ways consumers could use this invention. It could serve as a specialty appliance to cook novel foods. Or, it could be used to create customized meals that meet individual health needs. In what other ways do you think a machine like this could be helpful to people?

LESSON PLAN
Explore Breakfast Around the World

PROCESS:

  1. Instruct students to select any place in the world. Or, if you'd like the selections to be random, have students spin a globe and stop it with a finger. If their finger lands in water, have them spin the globe again. Then assign students the location where their finger landed. 
  2. Have students conduct research to learn about the people who live at their location. Encourage them to select one type of culture found there. Then challenge them to identify the components of a traditional breakfast eaten by people who belong to that culture. 
  3. Through their research, challenge students to identify a logical connection between the location, culture and foods they studied. If students struggle to make this connection, encourage them to consider criteria such as landscape, climate or even the length of the growing season.
  4. Provide an assortment of art supplies. Encourage students to create a 3D model of the breakfast they studied. Remind them to include all of the ingredients!

ASSESSMENT: 

Invite students to present their 3D breakfasts to the class. Instruct them to identify each ingredient. Challenge them to describe the logical link between the food, culture and location of the people they studied.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON: 

Grades 3-4:
Select a location or have one volunteer pick a spot on the spinning globe. Conduct research as a class to identify a culture found there and a traditional breakfast for those people. Challenge students to make a logical connection between the location, culture and foods found in the traditional breakfast. Encourage each student to make a 3D model of the meal. 
Grades 5-6:
Divide the class into small groups. Assign locations or have a volunteer from each group pick a spot on the spinning globe. Instruct groups to conduct research to learn about their location. Tell them to pick one culture found there and identify a traditional breakfast eaten by those people. Challenge groups to make a logical connection between the location, culture and the foods they studied. Encourage group members to work together to make a 3D model of their meal. 
Grades 7-8: 
Divide the class into small groups. Instruct each group to select a location. Make sure there are no repeats. Have groups conduct research to learn about the people who live there. Tell them to pick one culture and identify a traditional breakfast eaten by those people. Instruct groups to identify specific ingredients used to make this meal. Then challenge them to make a logical connection between the location, culture and the foods they studied. Encourage group members to work together to make a 3D model of their meal. 
Grades 9-10:
Divide the class into pairs. Instruct partners to select a location and conduct research to learn about the people who live there. Tell them to pick one culture and identify a traditional breakfast eaten by those people. Instruct partners to identify specific ingredients used to make this meal. Then have them make a 3D model of their meal. As pairs present their findings, encourage the class to identify different places where people eat the same type of breakfast foods. Challenge students to use what they learned about location, culture and food to explain these similarities.
SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
Key Ingredients: America by Food
Help students explore the impact of food on American history, discover local food traditions and look at the way food is advertised with this site from the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. Among the site’s many resources is a teaching guide with five engaging lessons.

Food Mapping
In this teacher-created lesson from the Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, students analyze the “food system” in their community. They look for solutions to any ecological or social problems inherent in the system.

Why Do We Eat Cereal For Breakfast? And Other Questions About American Meals Answered
Food historian Abigail Carroll traces the evolution of American eating from colonial times to present-day. Read all about it in this Smithsonian article.

Bon Appétit! Julia Child’s Kitchen at the Smithsonian
This online exhibit from the National Museum of American History is about Julia Child and her profound effect on American popular culture, cooking and broadcast television.

The Untold Tale of Pow!, the Fourth Rice Krispies Elf
Read this Smithsonian article for a look into the era when the cereal mascots were more than just Snap!, Crackle! and Pop!

Chef Margarita Carrillo Arronte on Why Mexican Cuisine Is a UNESCO Treasure
Read this Smithsonian article to meet the woman dedicated to preserving traditional Mexican cuisine.
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