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Write a Movie Pitch

Students will choose their favorite book and write a pitch to turn the book into a movie.

PROCESS:

  1. Tell students that before any movie can be made, one thing has to be done: Someone has to pitch the idea to those who will make the movie. They have to sell their idea and convince the buyers it will be a success. And they don't have much time to do this.
  2. Explain that the first thing you have to do when writing a pitch is to grab people's attention. Write one or two sentences, or a logline, that captures the big idea by summarizing the core conflict and leaves buyers wanting to learn more.
  3. Then, you must write a brief outline of your idea. Don't tell the whole story, but do introduce the main characters and summarize the plot. Emphasize key details or moments that make your story unique and worth watching.
  4. The final step is presentation. Remember, you are selling your idea. Be confident. Be enthusiastic. Present your idea and answer any questions the buyers have with brief, accurate answers.
  5. Have students choose their favorite book. Instruct them to write a pitch-both logline and outline-to turn that book into a movie.
  6. Invite students to pitch their ideas to the class. Encourage classmates to ask questions about each idea. Challenge presenters to give brief, accurate answers.

ASSESSMENT:

After all ideas have been presented, have the class vote to select the one book most students would like to see made into a movie. Discuss reasons why students think this movie would be a success.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
As a class, select one book that all students like. Divide the class into small groups. Give groups time to write a pitch to turn that book into a movie. Compare and contrast the results.
Grades 5-6:
Divide the class into small groups. Instruct each group to select one book that all group members like. Give them time to write a pitch to turn that book into a movie.
Grades 7-8:
Divide the class into pairs. Have each pair select a book that both group members like. Give partners time to write a pitch to turn that book into a movie. Remind students that movie executives have very busy schedules. Challenge them to present their ideas in less than three minutes.
Grades 9-10:
Instruct each student to select his or her favorite book. Give them time to write a pitch to turn that book into a movie. Challenge students to write a strong one-sentence logline and a brief outline that takes no more than three minutes to present.