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Insert Yourself Into a Book

Students will select a book they identify with and write a short scene inserting themselves into the story. They will summarize reasons why they identify with the book and how their character's storyline might eventually unfold.

PROCESS:

  1. Point out that people identify with books for many different reasons. Perhaps they share personality traits with one of the characters. Or maybe they're going through a situation similar to one described in the book. Sometimes the connection is strong and other times it's not. But that connection helps readers relate to the story at hand.
  2. Encourage students to select a book that they most identify with. Instruct them to write a short scene in which they insert themselves as characters in the story.
  3. Have students write a brief summary explaining why they identify with this book and how their character's storyline might eventually unfold.

ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to share their scenes and summaries with the class. After all students have shared, encourage students identify the most common reasons students related to their selected stories.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
Pre-select four books that you think most students in the class will relate to. Display the books and have students choose the one book they most identify with. Divide the class into groups, one for each book. Encourage group members to discuss reasons why they relate most to that book. Then divide each group into pairs. Have partners work together to write one new scene in which they both appear. Then have them summarize why they both identify with the book and how their characters' storylines might eventually unfold.
Grades 5-6:
Divide the class into pairs. Instruct partners to select one book they can both relate to. Encourage them to discuss reasons why they chose this book. Then have partners work together to write a new scene in which they both appear. Once the scene is finished, have students write their own summaries explaining why they identify with the book and how they think their character's storyline might eventually unfold.
Grades 7-8:
Have students complete the activity on their own. Instruct them to write a scene that has a logical connection to the existing storyline. Encourage them to write a thoughtful summary explaining why they chose this particular book. Challenge them to be creative as they explain how their character's storyline might eventually unfold.
Grades 9-10:
Have students select the book they most identify with and write a new scene inserting themselves as a main character into the story. Encourage students to write a thoughtful summary explaining why they chose this particular book. Challenge them to be creative as they explain how the addition of their character could impact the plot as the story continues to unfold.