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Design a Mini-Golf Course

Students will find and examine photos of mini-golf courses. They will select elements that showcase difficulty, creativity or technology and incorporate them into designs for their own mini-golf courses. They will draw sketches and build models of their ideas.

PROCESS:

  1. As a class, discuss what it's like to play mini-golf. Encourage students to describe some of the mini-golf courses they've seen.
  2. Invite students to search the Internet to find photos of mini-golf courses. Which courses look like they'd be the most fun? Which look like they'd be the most difficult to play? How is each course designed around a theme? And how could people use new technology to create a "modern" version of a golf course of the past?
  3. Instruct students to select their favorite elements. Challenge them to incorporate those elements into their own designs of a mini-golf course. Give students time to sketch a model of their courses.
  4. Provide a variety of art materials or have students bring items from home. Encourage students to build a model of at least one hole on their mini-golf course.

ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to share their drawings and models with the class. Instruct them to identify the overall themes of their mini-golf courses. Then have them explain how the difficulty, creativity or technology they incorporated into their designs will ensure that their mini-golf courses are a success.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
As a class, search online to find photos of mini-golf courses. Be sure to find examples from the past as well as some that exist today. Help students identify elements designed to be difficult or creative as well as those that require technology to work. As a class, select a theme for a mini-golf course. Divide the class into nine groups. Challenge each group to design one hole for a 9-hole mini-golf course. Compare and contrast the results.

Grades 5-6:
Divide the class into small groups. Have groups search online to find photos of mini-golf courses. Tell them to be sure to find examples from the past as well as some that exist today. Encourage students to identify elements designed to be difficult or creative as well as those that require technology to work. Encourage groups to pick a theme for a mini-golf course. Then give them time to sketch a model of a 9-hole mini-golf course. Provide supplies and challenge them to build a model of one hole in their designs.

Grades 7-8:
Divide the class into pairs. Give partners time to find and study photos of mini-golf courses from the past as well as some that exist today. Then give pairs time to select a theme and sketch a model of their own 18-hole mini-golf course. Provide supplies and challenge partners to build models of three holes in their designs.

Grades 9-10:
Divide the class into pairs. Give partners time to find and study photos of mini-golf courses from the past as well as some that exist today. Then give pairs time to select a theme and sketch a model of their own 18-hole mini-golf course. Provide supplies and challenge partners to build models of three holes in their designs. One hole should be built for difficulty, one for creativity and one should require some sort of technology to work.