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Create a Comic Strip about Climate Change

Students will utilize the comic strip in the article as they analyze their views on climate change. Then they will create their own comic strips depicting potential scenarios for Earth's climate over the next thousand years.

PROCESS:

  1. Instruct students to write one sentence stating their personal opinions about climate change. Then have students review the comic strip about climate change in the article. Invite students to share the statements they wrote before reading the article. Encourage them to explain how the comic strip strengthened or changed their views.
  2. As a class, discuss how comic strips can be a good way to relate technical or scientific information to a mass audience.
  3. Instruct students to create their own comic strips depicting potential scenarios for Earth's climate over the next thousand years. Inform them that they can do this from one of two perspectives: do nothing and proceed as is or make changes to current habits that have been identified as contributing to climate change. Students may use the format presented in the article or come up with one of their own.

ASSESSMENT: 

Invite students to share their comic strips with the class. As they do, encourage them to explain the connection between certain events and their outcomes in relation to climate change. As a class, discuss the role conservation efforts could play in Earth's future.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
Divide the class into small groups. Encourage group members to choose a perspective on climate change. Then have them brainstorm ideas on how to best present their views in a comic strip. Give groups time to plan and complete timeline inspired comic strips such as the one in the article. Provide suggestions or assistance as needed.
Grades 5-6:
Review the various formats for creating a comic strip (i.e., one panel, multi-panel or a long and scrolling timeline as was used in the article). Have the class choose one format for all students to use. Then divide the class into small groups. Encourage group members to choose a perspective on climate change. Have them brainstorm ideas on how to best present their views in a comic strip. Give groups time to plan and complete their comic strips.
Grades 7-8: 
Review the various formats for creating a comic strip (i.e., one panel, multi-panel or a long and scrolling timeline as was used in the article). Then divide the class into pairs. Encourage partners to select a format for their comic strips. Then have them choose a perspective on climate change and brainstorm ideas on how to best present their views in a comic strip. Give pairs time to plan and complete their comic strips.
Grades 9-10:
Review the various formats for creating a comic strip (i.e., one panel, multi-panel or a long and scrolling timeline as was used in the article). Instruct each student to select a format to use. Then encourage them to identify which perspective they'd like to choose: do nothing or do something. Give students time to brainstorm ideas and complete their comic strips.