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Today's top trends in teaching
Why US classrooms are starting to resemble arcades
Why US classrooms are starting to resemble arcades
Bill would help the developmentally disabled attend college
Bill would help the developmentally disabled attend college
Ohio waives teaching license fees for military members, vets
Ohio waives teaching license fees for military members, vets
Deaf teacher's quest for armed service inspires students
Deaf teacher's quest for armed service inspires students
Missouri law aims to help teachers of traumatized children
Missouri law aims to help teachers of traumatized children
The Only Live News Report from the Attack on Pearl Harbor
On December 7, 1941, an NBC radio affiliate in Honolulu made an urgent phone call to New York. In it, he begins to describe what the world would later know as the attack on Pearl Harbor. Watch this video, courtesy of Smithsonian magazine, to hear that urgent report.
The Complicated Lead Up to Pearl Harbor
Take a step back with Curator Laurence Burke and explore the long and complicated history that led up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in this National Air and Space Museum article.
America’s Hidden Stories: Pearl Harbor Spies
The conventional story is that America was caught sleeping on the morning of December 7, 1941, and Pearl Harbor was hit without warning. But newly classified documents from the U.S. Naval Intelligence and the FBI reveal a very different tale, one of Japanese and German spies studying Pearl Harbor long before the assault. Watch this Smithsonian Channel video to learn about the undercover network.
Aerial America: Pearl Harbor
Years after the December 7th attack on Pearl Harbor, the devastation is still visible from the air. Watch this Smithsonian Channel video to see for yourself.
Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans and World War II
Ten weeks after Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, under which nearly 75,000 American citizens of Japanese ancestry were taken into custody. Another 45,000 Japanese nationals living in the United States (but long denied citizenship because of their race) were also incarcerated. Visit this National Museum of American History site to learn about their experiences and how some 40 years later, members of the Japanese American community led the nation to confront the wrong it had done—and to make it right.