Would you buy meat from a machine?
Would you buy meat from a machine? Residents watch the first meat vending machine installed in the French capital, in Paris, Tuesday, March 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
Would you buy meat from a machine?
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Parisians can get their beloved baguette 24 hours a day. So it seems only logical that they can now get the Bayonne ham and Basque pate that goes so well with the bread. It comes from the first meat vending machine installed in the French capital.

Paris is filled with small shops where long lunches remain a crucial part of the French "art de vivre." So the gleaming red machine set up on the lively Rue de Charonne in eastern Paris seems a bit incongruous.

The area has at least two dozen butcher's shops and no shortage of meat. But that didn't deter the owners of one of those shops, Florence and Michel Pouzol of "L'ami Txulette," from investing 40,000 euros ($45,000) to set up their project. They sell vacuum-packed meat from the refrigerated machine.

"We're closed two days: Sundays and Mondays," Florence Pouzol told The Associated Press. "So this is to cater for customers over the weekend. The idea was also to serve people after the shop's closing hours. We close at 8 p.m. but some people leave work very late and find the shop closed when they walk past it."

L'ami Txulette specializes in products from the Basque Country. From their machine, which takes cash or credit cards, customers can also get a large choice of traditional delicatessen including duck confit and beef carpaccio. There are also faux-filet steaks on display, priced at 34 euros per kilogram. On average, the products are 20 euro cents more expensive than those sold inside the shop.

A majority of shops remain closed on Sundays in France, but the Pouzols are confident that France is changing fast and so are their customers' habits.

"Our customers are young. There are also quite a few bars and restaurants along the boulevard," Florence Pouzol said. "When we see them during the day, they tell us: "Last night, I bought this, or that, and it was really helpful." We also have those who work in the cafes and restaurants and who come off work at 2 a.m. They tell us they were happy to buy an entrecote or something else to eat."

But not all residents, especially the older ones, seem ready to stop running errands at their favorite shop and switch to the meat dispenser.

"I'm so happy that I can actually go to the butcher's shop now that I'm retired and go there in person", said local resident Lydie Aparacio. "I think that it can be useful for people who are busier than a retiree. I don't use it because I have time."

While baguette dispensers have been enjoying a large success across France over the past five years, the meat vending machines business remains in in the embryonic stage in France. The first machine of this type was installed three years ago in the small western town of Garat by a butcher who set it up outside a bar.

According to the bar owner, it adds extra comfort in an area lacking services.

"We don't have a butcher's shop in town, the first one is located three kilometers (two miles) away," Jo Ferreira told the AP in a phone interview. "When you finish work at 7 p.m., it's very convenient to have this machine available. I love their minced burger steaks."

In the central medieval town of Mennetou-sur-Cher, popular with tourists, Pascal Bidron has installed a machine to sell his locally made andouillette, a sausage prepared with pig's intestines.

He bought a second-hand machine and put it next to his shop, which is closed for more than three hours during the daytime.

"I have customers coming from afar to buy my andouillettes and I wanted to serve them even when the shop is closed" Bidron told the AP. "I recently went away for two weeks and managed to sell 250 andouillettes during my vacation thanks to that machine. It's more than I expected."

Source URL: https://www.tweentribune.com/article/tween78/would-you-buy-meat-machine/

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CRITICAL THINKING QUESTION
Why are French shops closed on Sundays?
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COMMENTS (20)
  • brycec-ver
    4/04/2016 - 12:44 p.m.

    This article interested me because I always have wanted to go to France and a meat dispenser looks really cool!

  • victoriak-ver
    4/06/2016 - 10:24 a.m.

    This is very cool! The machine will allow for people to access the food all day!

  • valeriep-1-bar
    4/13/2016 - 08:51 p.m.

    THe French shops are closed on sundays because those are the days people have days off and they probably want to spend time with their families. Also France is made up mostly of christians so sunday is considered like a god day to go to church and having a rest day so people can be with their loved ones.

  • sebastianr-6-bar
    4/13/2016 - 11:14 p.m.

    French shops are closed on Sundays because they need to give employees a day at rest or some time to spend with there families if they have one. Also it might be closed on Sunday for religious purposes because this is the day most people go to church. I think this is a very cool efficient way to buy and keep a company in business with the meat in a machine.

  • seans-2-bar
    4/14/2016 - 11:09 p.m.

    My reasonable assumption is that French shops are closed on Sundays due to religious affiliation. However the termination on Monday is confusing. This level of relationship between church and state concerns me....as does the lack of horrid questions on the articles I have reviewed...maybe something is changing...

  • omccall-dav
    9/07/2016 - 10:08 p.m.

    In response to buying meat out of a machine. I would not buy meat out of a machine because the meat is twenty euro cents
    more than the meat in the store, so why pay more for the meat in a vacuum sealed bag than the fresh meat in the store. The second reason I would not buy meat out of an machine is because I think people should work for their money. This machine allows people to go on vacation and still get paid with out even being at work. I don't want to give the butchers the money if they are not even working. It says in the article, "the area has at least two dozen butcher shops and no shortage of meat. But that did not stop Florence and Michel Pouzol of L'ima Txulette, 'from investing 40,000 euros($45,000) to set up their project.' " My third reason is why spend so much money on a machine you buy meat out of when you can just walk into the store and buy meat. I would never waste money on something that we don't need.I understand that the machine helps the butcher sell meat when the store is closed but I still would not eat the meat out of a machine.

  • okathryn-dav
    10/20/2016 - 07:21 p.m.

    In the response to " Would you buy meat from a machine?"
    No, I would not buy meat out of a machine. One reason is because the meat could be out of date or spoiled. My second reason is because the meat might not be organic. My last reason is because I don't know who has touched the meat or where it has been.

  • hmadison-dav
    10/20/2016 - 10:02 p.m.

    In response to ''Would you buy meat from a machine?" I agree that we could buy meat from a machine. One reason I agree is that apparently it doesn't taste much different than the meats you buy at the store. "I love their minced burger steaks." said by Joe Ferreira. Another reason is that it is convenient to some people if the butchers shop isn't open. It says in the article "When you finish work at 7 p.m., it's very convenient to have this machine available." A third reason is that it is also beneficial to the employes salary when they aren't even working. "I recently went away for two weeks and managed to sell 250 andouillettes during my vacation thanks to that machine. It's more than I expected." Even though we don't buy meats from a vending machine normally, I think we could buy meats from a machine.

  • genesisj-
    3/01/2017 - 08:43 a.m.

    The meat shops are closed on Sundays because French people are religious. They go to church on Sundays. They expect that they'll go to church and I'm religious and some people from my church goes to work on Sundays...

  • JessieM-par
    5/22/2018 - 09:55 a.m.

    I think that the machines are very convenient for the people who work really late. They can get off work and go right across the street to get food that they can make very quickly.

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