King Tut’s hidden rooms are hidden no more Egypt's Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty, left, speaks during a press conference as he displays images of radar scans to King Tut's burial chamber on a projector, at the antiquities ministry in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, March 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
King Tut’s hidden rooms are hidden no more
Lexile

Scans of King Tut's burial chamber have revealed two hidden rooms, according to Egypt's antiquities minister. It is a discovery that could intensify speculation that the chambers contain the remains of the famed Queen Nefertiti.
 
Mamdouh el-Damaty told reporters March 17 that the secret chambers may contain metal or organic material, but he declined to comment on whether royal treasure or mummies could be inside. Analysis of the scans made by a Japanese team showed chambers that would be scanned again at the end of the month to get a better idea of what may lay inside.
 
"It means a rediscovery of Tutankhamun ... for Egypt it is a very big discovery, it could be the discovery of the century," el-Damaty said. "It is very important for Egyptian history and for all of the world."
 
The discovery could shine new light on one of ancient Egypt's most turbulent times, and one prominent researcher has theorized that the Nefertiti's remains could be inside. British Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves speculates that Tutankhamun, who died at the age of 19, may have been rushed into an outer chamber of what was originally Nefertiti's tomb, which archaeologists have yet to find.
 
Famed for her beauty, Nefertiti was the subject of a famous 3,300-year-old bust. Nefertiti was one of the wives of Tutankhamun's father, the Pharaoh Akhenaten.
 
El-Damaty said it was too early to tell what the metal and organic material could be, saying only that he thinks the new chambers could contain the tomb of a member of Tutankhamun's family.
 
The tomb lies in Luxor, in southern Egypt, which served as the Pharaonic capital in ancient times, and is home to sprawling temples and several highly decorated ancient tombs in the Valley of the Kings. The discovery of King Tut's nearly intact tomb by Howard Carter in 1922 sparked a renewed interest in Egyptology and yielded unprecedented Pharaonic treasures, including the boy king's sarcophagus and iconic golden burial mask.
 
Reeves reached his theory after high-resolution images discovered what he said were straight lines in King Tut's tomb. These lines, previously hidden by color and the stones' texture, indicate the presence of a sealed chamber, he said. The images were broadcast live on national television last September.
 
At the Cairo news conference, el-Damaty highlighted radar scans that showed anomalies in the walls of the tomb, indicating a possible hidden door and the chambers, which lay behind walls that were covered up and painted over with hieroglyphics.
 
Nefertiti was the primary wife of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, who unsuccessfully attempted to switch Egypt to an early form of monotheism. Akhenaten was succeeded by a pharaoh referred to as Smenkhare and then Tut, who was proven by genetic testing to have been Akhenaten's son.
 
Tut, Nefertiti, and Akhenaten's family ruled Egypt during one of its most turbulent times, which ended with a military takeover by Egypt's top general at the time, Horemheb. The family's names were later erased from official records.

Filed Under:  
Assigned 37 times
CRITICAL THINKING QUESTION
Why would a tomb have hidden rooms?
Write your answers in the comments section below


COMMENTS (14)
  • arielj1-pay
    3/28/2016 - 08:26 a.m.

    I've always had a fascination with Egyptian history and specifically King Tut. These tombs were so sacred and mysterious; it was necessary to keep tomb robbers from succeed. These famous pharaohs were buried with valuables that were at risk to be stolen if the pharaoh's tomb was discovered. That is why they created hidden rooms to throw off the possible tomb robbers.

  • bendalieg1-pay
    3/28/2016 - 08:28 a.m.

    A hidden in a tomb of a pharaoh might contain treasures such as gold and jewelry giving to the king so when he get to another world after his death he can still be rich and royal. The reason for that is that many cultures believe there is life after death.They believe their rulers have a connection with their idols.

  • zhanettec1-pay
    3/28/2016 - 08:55 a.m.

    I think they should stop trying to tamer with history, and let king tut rest in peace. Humans are constantly looking searching for newer historical features only to alter,or destroy them.

  • janayj1-pay
    3/28/2016 - 09:13 a.m.

    Hidden treasure, duh.

  • christopherf1-pay
    3/28/2016 - 09:21 a.m.

    This has been tremendous discovery, but pray do tell, what lies behind? A hidden room is obviously there for some reason (perhaps treasure?).

  • tatianam1-pay
    3/28/2016 - 09:26 a.m.

    king tut had hidden rooms he aint tell us bout how mean is that lol im sorry ran outta time love u mr payne

  • sharathr1-pay
    3/28/2016 - 10:00 a.m.

    Now that we have uncovered the hidden rooms to King Tuts tomb we can learn more about him since he remains a mysterious person. We can also learn more about ancient Egypt and possibly find other secret rooms.

  • garriellem1-pay
    3/28/2016 - 10:03 a.m.

    A tomb would have hidden rooms due to the tradition that Egyptians have carried for a while that their close ones are to follow in the after life. The rooms are occupied by close servants, family members, and even partners. It's likely that the hidden rooms in Tut's tomb hold his wife or family members.

  • nylae2-pay
    3/28/2016 - 10:16 a.m.

    A tomb would have hidden rooms because it's home to many ancient artifacts. When something has so much worth it should not be easily accessible to anybody.

  • allenm-pay
    4/05/2016 - 10:53 a.m.

    "It means a rediscovery of Tutankhamun ... for Egypt it is a very big discovery, it could be the discovery of the century," el-Damaty said. "It is very important for Egyptian history and for all of the world." The tomb lies in Luxor, in southern Egypt, which served as the Pharaonic capital in ancient times, and is home to sprawling temples and several highly decorated ancient tombs in the Valley of the Kings. The discovery of King Tut's nearly intact tomb by Howard Carter in 1922 sparked a renewed interest in Egyptology and yielded unprecedented Pharaonic treasures, including the boy king's sarcophagus and iconic golden burial mask. Akhenaten was succeeded by a pharaoh referred to as Smenkhare and then Tut, who was proven by genetic testing to have been Akhenaten's son. Tut, Nefertiti, and Akhenaten's family ruled Egypt during one of its most turbulent times, which ended with a military takeover by Egypt's top general at the time, Horemheb. The family's names were later erased from official records.

Take the Quiz Leave a comment
ADVERTISEMENT