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Monday Morning Ready06.10.2016
Jumpstart Your Week!

In recent years, little libraries of all shapes and sizes have popped up. They might be found on street corners and sidewalks. Often built by community members hoping to share their book collection with their neighbors, these "Little Free Libraries" are like a modern-day iteration of the classic bookmobile. Minneapolis, Minnesota, held the first Little Free Library Festival. Book fans and people with a do-it-yourself streak came together. ... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

If there were a Little Free Library in your community, what is the first book you would leave in the library? What is the first book you'd like to take? Why?

Grade 5-6

According to the article, Little Free Libraries are made out of things such as birdhouses and newspaper stand. Imagine you were building your own Little Free Library, what would you use to house the books?

Grade 7-8

In the article, Todd Bol says, "Something we long for in this digital age is that connection between people." How might physical books and Little Free Libraries build that connection?

Grade 9-10

According to the article, Little Free Libraries are meant to promote literacy and share books with neighbors. Do you think this idea would work where you live? Why or why not?

LESSON PLAN
Create a Summer Reading List

PROCESS:

  1. As a class, make a list containing each of the books students read as part of the curriculum during the current school year. Have students analyze the list to identify trends. For instance, are most of the books fiction or non-fiction? Do they deal with specific topics? When they read the books, did instruction focus on developing the plot, analyzing characters, following dialogue or some other important element of literature?
  2. Point out that these trends explain why they read these specific books. The books were an interesting way to cover what they needed to learn this year.
  3. Tell students to think of other books they've read that could accomplish these same goals. Challenge them to compile their ideas to create a summer reading list for next year's students that will help them prepare for the upcoming school year.  

ASSESSMENT: 

Invite students to share their ideas with the class. Challenge them to explain why they selected a specific book and how it will help next year's students prepare for the grade-level curriculum. 

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:    

Grades 3-4:
Brainstorm a list of books as a class. Challenge students to identify two to three books that address each main topic or literary element covered during the school year. Type the final list of books and distribute it to students who will be in your grade next year.

Grades 5-6:
Brainstorm a list of books as a class. Challenge students to identify two to three books that address each main topic or literary element covered during the school year. Have students write brief reviews of their favorite books on the list. Type the final list of books, including students' reviews. Distribute the list to students who will be in your grade next year.

Grades 7-8:
Divide the class into small groups. Challenge each group to identify four or five books that address each main topic or literary element covered during the school year. Have group members write a brief summary of each book on the list. Then have them type up their final list, including the summaries. Compile the information into one master list and post it online for students who will be in your grade next year.

Grades 9-10:
Divide the class into small groups. Challenge each group to identify four or five books that address each main topic or literary element covered during the school year. Have group members write a brief summary and a critical review of each book on the list. In their reviews, encourage them to identify how each book will help students prepare for next year's curriculum. Then have each group type up its final list, including the summaries and reviews. Compile the information into one master list and post it online for students who will be in your grade next year.

SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
American Authors and Innovation
Students will choose one of the American authors in this collection. They will research the author and read some of his or her writings. Then they will write a short persuasive essay arguing whether or not this author was innovative and if so how. They will determine whether or not innovation is important in determining the strength of a writer's work.

The Earliest Libraries-on-Wheels Looked Way Cooler Than Today’s Bookmobiles
Read this Smithsonian article to learn about the traveling libraries that used to travel around bringing books to the people.

The World’s Most Interesting (and Accessible) Library Collections
Read this Smithsonian article to learn what you can find—including everything from the Magna Carta to Winnie the Pooh—at some of the world’s great libraries.

Smithsonian Libraries
Encourage students to broaden their minds this summer by exploring the books, digital collections and exhibitions featured on the Smithsonian Libraries site. Collections cover subjects ranging from anthropology to zoology!

House Detectives: Finding History in Your Home
Have students use this printable guide from the National Museum of American History to carry out an interesting summer project: conducting research on their home or a local building. The guide describes the research process and explains how to summarize conclusions.

Anthropology: Summer Fieldwork Opportunities
Share this leaflet with students to show them how they can become personally involved in the field of anthropology this summer. The leaflet names various organizations that offer programs particularly suited for students and teachers.
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