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Monday Morning Ready04.13.2015
Jumpstart Your Week!

How should governments govern soda? An outright ban on large sugary drinks? A tiny tax? Or not at all? This debate has been playing out in New York, Berkeley and places in between—and one community recently made drastic moves to target people’s eating habits... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Assume a bag of chips costs $2.00. Increasing the sales tax 2 percent would make the chips cost four cents more. Would that 4-cent increase convince you not to buy the chips? Why or why not?

Grade 5-6

Do you think making unhealthy foods more expensive and healthy foods cheaper is the best way to solve a widespread health problem? Why or why not? What would you do?

Grade 7-8

In your opinion, should governments have the power to impose taxes on items considered to be unhealthy choices? Why or why not?

Grade 9-10

Many people buy junk food because it's cheap—not necessarily because it's what they prefer to eat. What do you think the true impact of a junk food tax will be in the Navajo Nation?

LESSON PLAN
Make a Virtual Exhibition

PROCESS:

  1. Display the National Museum of American History online exhibit "The Object of History." Select one object and review the information about that object with the class.
  2. Identify an overall topic students are currently studying in class. Instruct students to select one object within that topic that they consider to be important. Have students conduct research to learn more about the object.
  3. Using the activity "Create a Virtual Exhibit" as a guideline, challenge students to create a virtual exhibit about that object. Instruct students to describe the exhibit, include both text and images, and cite each source they used.

ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to present their finished exhibits to the class. Evaluate each based on the requirements for the assignment. Discuss with students how this format can be used to create a virtual exhibit on any subject.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
Have students complete the project in small groups. Provide assistance as they navigate the website. If necessary, suggest additional resources they could use.

Grades 5-6:
Have students complete the project in with a partner. Encourage them to include at least one interactive element in their exhibits.

Grades 7-8:
Have students complete the project with a partner. Tell students they may use the site mentioned in the lesson as a template or they can use another format if they would like to be more creative. Encourage them to explore the Smithsonian’s Virtual Exhibition site for ideas. Regardless of the format students use, each exhibit should provide substantial information on the topic, include interactive elements and provide a clear explanation for why the object is important. Students should also cite each source used.

Grades 9-10:
Have students each create their own virtual website. Advise them that the site mentioned in the lesson is only a guideline. They should create a design template of their own. Encourage them to explore the Smithsonian’s Virtual Exhibition site for ideas. Tell students that each exhibit should provide substantial information on the topic, include interactive elements and provide a clear explanation for why the object is important. Students should also cite each source used.

SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
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