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Monday Morning Ready02.23.2015
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The Eastman Kodak Co. will continue to make motion picture film in the age of digital filmmaking after reaching new supply agreements with the major Hollywood studios. The Rochester, N.Y.-based photography and film pioneer had been in talks with the studios, as well as several filmmakers including Quentin Tarantino, Judd Apatow and Christopher Nolan, to keep movie film alive after seeing sales fall 96 percent since 2006... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Do you think most consumers care how movies are made? If we are in the age of digital filmmaking, who do you think would care if motion picture film disappeared? Why?

Grade 5-6

In the article, Kodak Chief Executive Jeff Clarke says, “Film has long been—and will remain—a vital part of our culture.” Given how quickly technology changes, do you think anyone in Hollywood will still be using motion picture film in five or 10 years? Why?

Grade 7-8

Have you ever seen or used a camera that required film? If not, ask someone who has. How are cameras that require film different from digital cameras? How do you think shooting a movie on motion picture film might be different than creating one through digital processing?

Grade 9-10

In the article, Andrew Evenski, Kodak’s president of Entertainment & Commercial Films, said, “Enabling artists to use film will help them create the moments that make cinema history.” Do you agree with this statement? Do you think it would be impossible to create those same moments through digital processing? Why?

LESSON PLAN
Form a Valid Opinion

PROCESS:

  1. Select a current event or technological breakthrough related to a topic you are studying in class. Discuss with students what this event or breakthrough means and what it signifies for the future. Poll the class to see if students think the change is important. Does it even matter?
  2. Remind the class that it’s important to make informed decisions, and informed decisions come through research. As a class, in groups, or with a partner, encourage students to conduct research to learn more about the topic.
  3. Rejoin as a class. Encourage students to discuss what they learned. Then challenge them to each create a list outlining the pros and cons of the event or breakthrough. 

ASSESSMENT:

Have groups share their lists with the class. Poll the class again to see how students feel about the topic. Did conducting research affect the results? Why? Encourage students to use what they learned to support their opinions.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
As you review students’ lists, instruct students to circle the items that had the most influence on their opinions. Encourage students to explain why they thought these items were important and how they helped them form a valid opinion on the topic. 

Grades 5-6:
As students share their opinions, encourage them to identify each source where they got the information. Discuss the importance of using reliable sources when conducting research and evaluate the credibility of each source used.

Grades 7-8:
Instruct students to use their lists as an outline while they draft a short opinion piece on the topic. Invite students to share their essays in small groups. Encourage group members to listen closely and evaluate how well each student used facts to support his or her opinion.

Grades 9-10:
Instruct students to use their lists as an outline while they draft a short opinion piece on the topic. Invite students to share their essays in small groups. Encourage group members to listen closely and evaluate how well each student used facts to support his or her opinion. Then divide the class into two groups with opposing views. Encourage students to use their opinion pieces as support while the class debates the issue.

SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
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