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Monday Morning Ready03.04.2016
Jumpstart Your Week!

When you walk the streets of cities like New York and Washington, it's hard to miss the sculptures. Many mark the parks and neighborhoods. Historic figures often can be seen standing upright. Or sitting on their horses, stoically striking a pose. More often than not, these statues have another thing in common. It's their gender. The majority of public statues in the United States are of men.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

What is your favorite statue? Who or what does it show?

Grade 5-6

Do you think statues are a good way to honor important people and events in history? Why or why not?

Grade 7-8

Have you ever noticed that such a large proportion of statues in the U.S. depict men? Why do you think women have been overlooked?

Grade 9-10

What do you think the lack of statues depicting women reveals about culture in the United States? Do you think creating a bunch of statues of women now will make a difference? Why or why not?

LESSON PLAN
Create a Statue Honoring a Woman

PROCESS:

  1. Instruct students to select a large city or state. 
  2. Have students conduct research to identify statues of women in that location. Instruct them to create a map pinpointing where each statue can be found. Invite students to share what they know about each woman. Challenge them to explain why each statue was erected where it was. 
  3. Tell students to pick another historical female with an obvious connection to the city or state they chose. Instruct them to identify the exact location where they would place a statue honoring that woman. Have them list their reasons for choosing that particular spot. (i.e., an obvious connection to the woman's background, a high-traffic area, etc.)
  4. Give students time to draw a sketch showing what they think this statue should look like.

ASSESSMENT: 

Have students share their ideas and drawings with the class. Challenge them to explain why they think this woman, above all others, deserves to be honored in this way.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:     

Grades 3-4:
As a class, conduct research to identify statues of women in your state. Challenge students to find as many statues as they can. Plot the locations on one master map. As a class, select another woman to honor. Conduct research as a class. Divide the class into small groups. Give groups time to brainstorm ideas and draw a sketch of a statue honoring this woman. 

Grades 5-6:
Divide the class into small groups. Instruct groups to identify statues of women in your state. Challenge them to find as many statues as they can. Plot the locations on one master map. Have each group select another woman to honor. Give them time to conduct research to learn more about her. Then have groups brainstorm ideas and draw a sketch of a statue honoring this woman.

Grades 7-8:
Have students conduct the activity in small groups. Instruct each group to select a city or state. Make sure there are no repeats. Plot the locations on one master map. Analyze the results. Do some regions have more statues of women than others? If so, why do students think that is? Have each group select another woman to honor in its location. Give them time to conduct research to learn more about her. Then have each group member draw his or her vision of a statue honoring this woman.

Grades 9-10:
Have students conduct the activity in pairs. Instruct each pair to select a city or state. Make sure there are no repeats. Plot the locations on one master map. Analyze the results. Do some regions have more statues of women than others? If so, why do students think that is? Have each pair select another woman to honor in its location. Give them time to conduct research to learn more about her. Then have eave each partner draw his or her vision of a statue honoring this woman. Instruct students to write a brief summary explaining why the content and location of their statue is a fitting memorial to this woman. 

SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
Women’s Roles in Post World War II
In this teacher-created lesson, students follow the design process as they imagine a more equitable labor market in the years following the war.

Role Model Medal
In this lesson, students are encouraged to recognize a female role model in their lives by creating a special symbolic pin. Part of the resource “Winning the Vote for Women,” this activity includes a discussion on women’s suffrage and guidance on choosing effective symbols for the pin.

Remember Me Fondly
In this lesson, students compare the ways in which American and Mexican cultures express ideas of remembrance and honor ancestors.

Memorials: Art for Remembering
The lessons in this issue of “Art to Zoo” familiarize students with memorials. Students answer questions in a series of activities in which they examine four memorials from around the world and examples in their own community. In the culminating activity, students identify and create a memorial for someone they have “lost.”

Ten Historic Female Scientists You Should Know
While Marie Curie dominates the conversation, there have been many other brilliant women who have pursued science over the years. Read about 10 of those women who dedicated their lives to science and made significant advances in this Smithsonian article.

Women’s History Teaching Resources
Use these Smithsonian resources to explore women’s history from a variety of perspectives.
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