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Monday Morning Ready02.12.2016
Jumpstart Your Week!

George Washington's hairstyle is iconic and simple enough that most Americans can probably recall it in an instant. Or they can at least refresh their memory by pulling out a dollar bill or a quarter. It was pulled back from his forehead and puffy on the sides.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Do you think George Washington's hairstyle is easy to recognize? What other historical hairstyles could you identify quickly?

Grade 5-6

Why do you think military people in the 18th century liked the queue hairstyle?

Grade 7-8

What does the queue hairstyle tell you about the 18th-century military? What does the buzz cut tell you about the military today?

Grade 9-10

George Washington died more than 200 years ago, but people easily recognize him and his popular hairstyle. Fast-forward 200 years. Name three people living now who you think will be recognized just as easily for their distinctive looks.

LESSON PLAN
Build a Historical Family Tree

PROCESS:

  1. Inform students that they will each create a mock family tree in which all of their relatives are important people in history. Their genealogy must at least go back to their grandparents' generation on both sides of the family. 
  2. Tell students they can choose anyone they want, but there must be a reason. 
  3. Have students create a preliminary list of people they might want to include. Then give them time to conduct research. If they come across someone they find to be more interesting, encourage them to revise their ideas.
  4. Instruct students to compile their research in the form of a family tree. 

ASSESSMENT: 

Have students present their genealogy to the class or in small groups. Instruct them to explain why they chose at least one of the historical figures on their family trees. 

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:     

Grades 3-4:
Review the concept of a family tree with the class. Have each student draw a family tree diagram with three generations on both sides of the family. Tell students to write their own names at the bottom of their trees. As a class, brainstorm a list of historical figures that students could include. Discuss reasons why each person would be an interesting choice. Then give students time to conduct research and compile their trees. Have them explain why they chose one of the historical figures. 

Grades 5-6:
Have each student draw a family tree diagram with three generations on both sides of the family. Tell students to write their own names at the bottom of their trees. As a class, brainstorm a list of historical figures that students could include. Discuss reasons why each person would be an interesting choice. Then give students time to conduct research and compile their trees. Have them explain why they chose the historical figures representing their parents.

Grades 7-8:
Have each student draw a family tree with four generations on both sides of the family. Remind them to write their own names at the bottom of the tree. Give students time to conduct research and compile their trees. Have them write and present a short paragraph explaining why they chose the historical figures representing their parents and one other family member.

Grades 9-10:
Have each student draw a family tree with four generations on both sides of the family. Then give students time to conduct research and compile their trees. Have them write and present a short paragraph explaining why they chose the historical figures representing each family member. As students present, challenge classmates to identify any crossovers and determine how that would make the students involved related to each other.

SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
Hands-On Presidential Activities
This interactive site features four activities. Students will explore the different roles of the president, learn more about the presidents' children, examine the presidential seal and look at actual letters written to presidents by students like them.

Young America Lesson Plan: George Washington
In this lesson, students use a combination of artwork, everyday objects, and primary sources to learn about George Washington’s life and leadership.

Mr. President: Profile of Our Nations Leaders
This website has brief biographies, vital stats, and National Portrait Gallery paintings of all of the presidents, from Washington to the present. Students can use the site for research, homework help or just for browsing.

George Washington: A National Treasure
Use this teacher guide to introduce students to some of the events and issues that shaped George Washington’s life. The activities should enhance students’ knowledge of Washington and expand their horizons about this complex and interesting man.

U.S. Presidents Quiz
Can your students name all of the U.S. presidents? Challenge them to name all 44 before the clock runs out!

Dear Mr. President
In this lesson, students will analyze a letter written to President Abraham Lincoln, the write and send their own letters to the president of the United States.
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