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Monday Morning Ready09.10.2015
Jumpstart Your Week!

Since 1917, the tallest mountain in North America has been known as “Mount McKinley” on official maps and registers. But on August 28, the Department of the Interior declared that the 20,237-foot peak would once again be officially known as “Denali,” the name it held for thousands of years.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Do you think it was right for the gold prospector to rename “Denali” after William McKinley? Why or why not?

Grade 5-6

Do you think the name “Mount McKinley would have stuck if it hadn’t been included on official maps? Why or why not?

Grade 7-8

Why do you think people thought it was acceptable to rename so many natural wonders that Native Americans had named long before?

Grade 9-10

In what ways do you think the renaming of natural wonders impacted Native American cultures? How do you think it impacted other people’s views of those cultures?

LESSON PLAN
Map Native American History

PROCESS:

  1. Tell students to imagine that they are mapmakers. State lawmakers recently declared that all of the natural wonders in your state will once again be referred to by their original Native American names. Their job is to revise the official state map.
  2. Instruct students to conduct research to identify two or more natural wonders in your state that originally had Native American names. Tell students to record the current and previous names of each natural wonder and locate each natural wonder on a state map. Encourage them to investigate to learn more about each place.
  3. Then have students trace the outline of a state map and plot each location. Tell students to write the name of each natural wonder on the new state maps.


ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to present their maps to the class. As they do, instruct them to plot and name their locations on one master state map. Give students a moment to examine the final master map. Discuss how using the original names of natural wonders can help people better understand the state’s cultural history.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3-4:
Have students complete the project in small groups. Instruct each group to select two natural wonders. Review the choices to ensure that each location is only chosen once.

Grades 5-6:
Have students complete the project in small groups. Instruct each group to select four natural wonders. Tell students to identify which Native American group gave the natural wonder its original name and what that name means in English.

Grades 7-8:
Have students complete the project with a partner. Instruct each pair to select five or more natural wonders. Tell students to identify which Native American group gave the natural wonder its original name and what that name means in English. As students conduct research, challenge them to discover who each natural wonder was renamed after and why each location was renamed.

Grades 9-10:
Have students complete the project with a partner. Challenge pairs to identify as many of the state’s natural wonders with original Native American names as they can. Instruct students record each natural wonder’s current and former name and what the original name means in English. Tell them to also record when, why and by whom each location was renamed.

SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
We Have a Story to Tell
In this unit, students will explore how colonial settlement and the establishment of the United States affected the Native Americans of the Chesapeake region. They will learn about the forces that resulted in the eradication of some tribes and how others survived. Students will also participate in small group projects to understand issues of critical importance to Chesapeake Native communities today.

Native People and the Land
In this unit, which focuses on the A:shiwi (Ahh-SHE-we) people of the American Southwest, students will learn about the connection Native people have to their natural world. Students will make observations about how the A:shiwi (also known as Zuni) people adapt to their environment and the cyclical aspect of their cultural and agricultural practices. Students will expand their knowledge through independent research on another Native community and their interactions with the natural world.

Haudenosaunee Guide for Educators
In this unit, students will learn about the Haudenosaunee, which is a confederation or alliance among six Native American nations who are more commonly known as the Iroquois Confederacy. Themes cover history and culture, government, the connection that people have to the world around them, and how the cultures have changed over time.

Infinity of Nations, Culture Quest
In this activity, students will travel to 10 regions on a map of North and South America. At each location, they will complete an activity that gives them specific knowledge about a Native nation, its environment and an object related to that culture.

Reviving the Ohlone Language
In this video, students learn how Linda Yamane is using archived and ethnographic research to bring back the language of the Ohlone, a Northern California tribe.
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