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Monday Morning Ready05.04.2015
Jumpstart Your Week!

In the days after a crushing earthquake hit the country of Nepal on April 25, there is still time to save lives. That's why governments and aid agencies are sending doctors, volunteers and equipment without waiting for the dust to settle. The estimates are that thousands of people have been killed... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Why do you think people see the reopening of the airport in Kathmandu as a small miracle? Why is it so difficult getting supplies here by land?

Grade 5-6

Why does disease spread so quickly after a disaster like this? What can people do to prevent this from happening?

Grade 7-8

The article states that helicopters are the key to accessing areas near the epicenter. Why? And why would high altitude prevent people from using the helicopters they so desperately need?

Grade 9-10

Countries from all over the world are sending rescue workers, supplies and money to Nepal. Why would it be difficult to coordinate an effort like this? How do you think it could be done?

LESSON PLAN
Create a Disaster Relief Kit

PROCESS:

  1. Display the preview to the video “Rescue 3D.” Challenge students to identify the different types of natural disasters it depicts and how people help in each situation.
  2. Brainstorm with students to create a list of different types of natural disasters that could potentially strike where you live. Challenge students to recognize things they already do to prepare for these conditions. For example, all schools have fire drills. Many schools also have tornado drills several times a year.
  3. Point out to students that they may not somewhere with an organized plan when a natural disaster strikes. That’s why it’s important for them to know what to do and to be prepared for any situation.
  4. If you teach students in grades 3-4 or 5-6, review the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s “Be a Hero” site with the class. Examine the section “Know the Facts” to learn about different types of natural disasters. Then review with students how to make a plan and build a kit. Instruct students to talk with their families to make a plan and build a disaster relief kit for their homes.
  5. If you teach students in higher grades, review the Department’s “Ready2015” site. Divide the class into small groups and have students explore the section “Be Informed” to learn about different types of natural disasters. Instruct them to then examine the sections “Make a Plan” and “Build a Kit.” Encourage students to create plans and build kits for their families.

ASSESSMENT:

Invite students to share their plans and a photo of their kits with the class. Examine the plans and kits to ensure that they contain all of the necessary items.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:

Grades 3–4:
Provide students with a copy of Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) family communication plans for parents and kids. Encourage them to complete both documents with their families when they create their emergency plans.

Grades 5–6:
Provide students with a copy of Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) family communication plans for parents and kids. Encourage them to complete both documents with their families when they create their emergency plans. Challenge students to identify two different emergency situations and customize a plan for each.

Grades 7–8:
As students make their plans, instruct them to include family communication plans for parents and kids. Challenge them to consider the needs of young children, pets and family members with disabilities. Require them to include guidelines for safely shutting off utilities as well as a detailed drawing of the planned escape route. Then review the list of items needed for a basic disaster supply kit. Challenge students to identify any additional emergency supplies they chose to include and explain why those supplies were necessary.

Grades 9–10:
As students make their plans, instruct them to include family communication plans for parents and kids. Challenge them to consider the needs of young children, pets and family members with disabilities. Require them to include guidelines for safely shutting off utilities as well as a detailed drawing of the planned escape route. Review with students why it is also important to be tech ready when disaster strikes and how this can be accomplished. Then review the list of items needed for a basic disaster supply kit. Challenge students to identify any additional emergency supplies they chose to include and explain why those supplies were necessary. Instruct students to also review rules for car safety and to create an emergency kit for each vehicle their family owns.

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