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Monday Morning Ready11.04.2016
Jumpstart Your Week!

With powerful engines, extensive firepower and heavy armor, the newly christened battleship USS South Dakota steamed out of Philadelphia in August of 1942 spoiling for a fight. The crew was made up of "green boys." These were recruits who enlisted after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. The young men had no qualms about either their destination or the action they were likely to see. ... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Do you think the Navy should have taken away Calvin Graham's medals? Why or why not?

Grade 5-6

Do you know anyone your age that did something heroic? If so, what did they do? Why do you think it was heroic?

Grade 7-8

According to the article, the dentist who examined Calvin Graham allowed several underage boys to enlist in the Navy. Why do you think he did that? Why do you think the boys lied about their ages? Do you think it was fair that Graham was punished for this deception? Or do you think the dentist should have been punished instead? Explain your opinions.

Grade 9-10

In 1942, young men were eager to sign up for the military and fight for their country. Do you think people your age have this same sense of patriotism now? If so, how do you think they express these feelings? If not, why do you think the national mood has changed?

LESSON PLAN
Write a News Article

PROCESS:

  1. Inform students that several different types of news articles appear in newspapers and magazines: a) Straight news articles report on breaking news or current events. b) Background pieces analyze what's behind breaking news to give readers more perspective on current events. c) Investigative reports go even deeper, usually digging up secrets someone is trying to hide. d) Features focus on people, introducing the public to ordinary people who do extraordinary things. e) And opinion pieces, or editorials, are a means for journalists to express their personal opinions. 
  2. Discuss the merits of each type of news article. Then ask students which format is used in the article about World War II veteran Calvin Graham. (feature) Why? (It's not breaking news. It didn't dig up any secrets. It doesn't express an opinion. It tells about an ordinary person who did an extraordinary thing.)
  3. Instruct students to identify an event that happened during a war or a veteran who received a medal for his or her actions during a war. Have them then select a style of news article that is appropriate for their subject. Give students time to investigate their topic and write a detailed news report.

ASSESSMENT: 

Invite students to share their news articles with the class. Instruct them to identify the type of news article they wrote and explain why they chose that format to report on their subject.  

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:     

Grades 3-4:
As a class, select a topic for a news article. Then have the class vote to decide which type of news article students want to write. Divide the class into small groups. Have each group conduct research to learn more about the topic. Rejoin as a class to share information. Work together to write a detailed news article on the selected topic.

Grades 5-6:
Divide the class into small groups. Instruct each group to select a topic for its news article. If necessary, provide suggestions. Then tell students to choose the type of article they'd like to write. Remind the class that whichever format they choose, the content must be based on facts. Give students time to investigate their topics and write their articles.

Grades 7-8:
Divide the class into pairs. Instruct each pair to select a topic for its news article. Then tell students to choose the type of article they'd like to write. Give students time to investigate their topics and write their articles. As they write, remind them to develop their topics with facts, definitions and concrete details about the subject. Encourage them to include quotes from sources involved in the story.

Grades 9-10:
Instruct each student to select a topic and format for a news article. Then have students investigate their subjects and write their articles. As they write, tell students to develop their topics with facts, definitions and concrete details. Encourage them to include several quotes from sources involved in the story. As an added challenge, have students find appropriate photos to accompany their articles. 

SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
1812: A Nation Emerges
In these four lessons from the National Portrait Gallery, students use their critical thinking skills to examine, analyze and compare/contrast artworks to better understand the events of the War of 1812. Lessons include a historical research project in which students create a textbook entry to demonstrate their understanding.

The Marines Have Confirmed That One of the Men in the Iconic Iwo Jima Photo Has Been Misidentified f
Read this Smithsonian article to learn why Pvt. 1st Class Harold Schultz never publicly spoke about his role in the iconic event.

These Eerie Civil War Photos Changed How the U.S. Saw Veterans
Read this Smithsonian article to learn how Reed Bontecou’s groundbreaking photography used a new medium to bring attention to the wounds of war.

Battle of the Bulge: Americans Respond to a German Surprise
This National Museum of American History high school lesson plan uses a video clip and primary sources to develop an understanding of the challenges facing the ground troops during World War II’s Battle of the Bulge. Students use this understanding to role-play one of those soldiers and write a letter home.

The Soldier’s Experience—Vietnam versus World War I
Have middle school students analyze museum artifacts and first-person accounts of daily life as a soldier in World War I and the Vietnam War in this lesson plan from the National Museum of American History. After research, students take on different roles to create a newscast about the experience of fighting in these two wars.

War of Independence Activity: Who’s in Camp?
In this lesson, elementary students play the “Who’s in camp?” card game to gain a deeper understanding of the many civilian and military roles that supported the American War of Independence.
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