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Monday Morning Ready12.04.2015
Jumpstart Your Week!

A great book enchants readers by invoking incredible worlds from words. These imaginative places exist in the familiar space between writers and their audiences. But occasionally, the illusion blends into other forms of art.... < read more >
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
Grade 3-4

Which places would be included on a literary map of your favorite book? What would these places look like?

Grade 5-6

Do you think you would understand books better if they all had detailed literary maps outlining the action? Why or why not?

Grade 7-8

Do you think it would be more difficult to create a literary map based on a book that was fiction or nonfiction? Why?

Grade 9-10

Few books for advanced readers include illustrations. Would you rather see illustrations or be free to imagine the places on your own? Why?

LESSON PLAN
Create Literary Maps

PROCESS:

  1. Invite students to watch the video that accompanies the article. Then display Andrew DeGraff's literary map for A Wrinkle in Time on a large screen. Encourage students to describe what they see. Zoom in on specific areas to examine the details they contain. If students haven't noticed the different colored paths, be sure to point out that each one tracks a character's movement throughout the story. 
  2. Have students select a book they've recently read. Instruct them to list all characters in the story. Then have them identify and write a detailed description of each key location. Finally, tell students to create a timeline showing when each character visited each location.
  3. Provide art supplies and large sheets of paper. You may want to consider using bulletin board paper. Allow students ample time to create detailed literary maps for their books.

ASSESSMENT: 

Invite students to present their literary maps to the class. Encourage them to identify each location and point out details they included to help readers understand what happened at each place.

CUSTOMIZE THE LESSON:    

Grades 3-4:
Select one book all students have read. As a class, identify places and characters and create the timeline. Then divide the class into small groups. Have one group create the background image for the literary map. Instruct that group to include a map key and a compass rose. Assign each of the other groups one location. Challenge students to be as accurate and detailed as possible. When all groups are finished, compile the information and add character routes to complete the literary map.  

Grades 5-6:
Divide the class into small groups. Have each group select a book. Instruct groups to identify important places and key characters in their story. Then have them create a detailed timeline of the action. Give groups time to create a background image and detailed close-ups of each location. Remind students to add route maps for each character along with a map key and compass rose so others can follow the action outlined on their maps.

Grades 7-8:
Assign each student a partner. Have pairs select a book that both partners have read. Instruct them to identify important places and key characters and then create a detailed timeline of the story. Encourage students to select a background design that not only helps readers follow the storyline but has significant meaning on its own. Then give them time to create detailed close-ups of each location. Tell students to add route maps for each character and a map key that will help others navigate their literary maps.

Grades 9-10:
Assign each student a partner. Instruct pairs to select a nonfiction book both students have read that ties in directly with something they are studying in another class. Then have pairs identify important places and key characters in their books. Challenge them to create an accurate and detailed timeline of the story. Encourage students to select a background design that not only helps readers follow the storyline but has significant meaning on its own. Give students time to create detailed close-ups of each location. Tell students to add route maps for each character and a map key that will help others navigate their literary maps.

SMITHSONIAN RESOURCES
Portraits: Written and Visual
These lessons introduce students to the lives and works of Louisa May Alcott and Samuel Clemens through their portraits as well as through their writings. Students will come away with a better understanding of how the events of one’s life can be an inspiration for creative writing.

Telling our own stories through corridos
This lesson plan uses the lyrics and music of corridos along with an accompanying website to analyze written texts, visual images and objects that will develop students’ understanding of various themes, regions and perspectives of North American history. Students will look at music as a primary source of history by interviewing family members about the songs they grew up with and comparing these songs to narrative corridos.

Ekphrastic Poetry Lesson
In this lesson plan, students will view a work of art and articulate what they see. Then they will write their own ten-line ekphrasis—a poem that is inspired by a work of art.

Telling a Painting's Story
In this lesson, students will either visit a museum or online exhibit and choose a painting to work with. They will list the details of the work and then write a description designed to help others imagine what the painting looks like. Afterward, students write stories about their paintings based on their descriptions.

Silhouettes and Interiors
This is a self-discovery lesson in which students will examine genres of art and literature and create their own personal poetry and collages.
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