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Tech & Learning Awards MackinVIA Best of Show at ISTE 2016
Tech & Learning Awards MackinVIA Best of Show at ISTE 2016
How GoFundMe Helped Me Enrich My Students’ Summer
How GoFundMe Helped Me Enrich My Students’ Summer
Bill would help the developmentally disabled attend college
Bill would help the developmentally disabled attend college
Ohio waives teaching license fees for military members, vets
Ohio waives teaching license fees for military members, vets
Deaf teacher's quest for armed service inspires students
Deaf teacher's quest for armed service inspires students
Little Golden Books Exhibition
From "The Poky Little Puppy" to "Doctor Dan the Bandage Man," the Little Golden Books have been a childhood staple since 1942. Take a trip back in time and explore some of earlier books in the series with this National Museum of American History exhibition.
Symbols in a Story: What’s What?
Invite students to explore this interactive, in which players go deep inside the painting “Achelous and Hercules,” by American regionalist Thomas Hart Benton. The artist set the Greek myth in rural Missouri, giving it a new figurative meaning. The activity introduces the literary devices of symbol, simile and metaphor.
The Storied, International Folk History of Beauty and the Beast
Read this Smithsonian article to learn all about the tales of a bride and her animal groom, which have circulated orally for centuries in Africa, Europe, India and Central Asia.
Children’s Book Creations
In this lesson from the Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, high school students will read a Japanese folktale, “Momotaro: Boy of the Peach,” to learn about Japanese culture and story structure. They will then create a children’s book version of the Momotaro story to share with younger readers.
Camping With the Sioux
In the fall of 1881, Alice Fletcher traveled to Dakota Territory to live with Sioux women and study their way of life. Visit this site, created by the National Museum of Natural History, to read the journals she kept and the Sioux folktales she recorded during her stay.