Lack of water a big problem for California

Science
Soprano seeks to go where no singer has gone before British soprano Sarah Brightman is aiming to perform where no professional singer has ever gone before: the International Space Station. The 54-year-old says she is working with composer Andrew Lloyd Webber. He is her ex-husband. They plan to create a song she will sing in s... - Posted on March 31, 2015
For archaeologists, ancient bones are like Christmas They came from every parish of London, and from all walks of life. They ended up in a burial ground called Bedlam. Now scientists hope their centuries-old skeletons can reveal information about how long-ago Londoners lived. And about the bubonic plague that often killed them. ... - Posted on March 31, 2015
Wild horses may save threatened butterflies Twenty-five years ago, it was a military zone where occupying Soviet troops held exercises. Today it's a sanctuary inhabited by wild animals that scientists hope will improve biodiversity among local plants as well as save endangered species. A herd of 14 wild mares from Bri... - Posted on March 27, 2015
Ancient salamander was as long as a car! Fossil remains of a previously unknown species of a crocodile-like "super salamander" have been found. The super salamander grew as long as a small car and was a top predator more than 200 million years ago. The fossil remains were found in southern Portugal. The spec... - Posted on March 27, 2015
Young scientists impress Obama at White House The small Lego machine inside the White House whirred. And in a moment it was turning the pages of a story book. One page flipped. Then another, ever faster as President Barack Obama marveled at its efficiency. The contraption's eventual aim would allow paralyzed or arthriti... - Posted on March 26, 2015
What makes the Mile High City a mile high? Geologists may finally be able to explain why Denver, the Mile High City, is a mile high. It's water. A new theory suggests that chemical reactions, triggered by water far below the Earth's surface, could have made part of the North American plate less dense many millions of... - Posted on March 19, 2015
Could you handle the harshest winter on earth? Gary Gustafson leans on his ice ax to catch his breath. His legs and lungs, straining from nearly five hours of climbing and 4,000 feet of elevation gain, plead for rest before he spies the top of an antenna on the summit. Soon, the crampons of his mountaineering boots are once aga... - Posted on March 18, 2015
Care for a dip in hot spring…near Saturn? New research suggests there are hot springs bubbling beneath the icy surface of a tiny Saturn moon. The moon is called Enceladus. It's pronounced ehn-SEHL'-uh-duhs. If confirmed, it would make the moon the only other known body in the solar system besides Earth where ... - Posted on March 16, 2015
Did your body complain about daylight saving time? How did your body like the switch to daylight saving time? When your alarm went off an hour early, did you want to hit the snooze button? If your body complained, it had good reason. Most Americans lose at least an hour of sleep after setting their clocks ahead. An hour may ... - Posted on March 13, 2015
Lack of water a big problem for California California has received a double dose of bad drought news. State officials say the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada is far below normal and that residents again aren't coming close to meeting Gov. Jerry Brown's call for a 20 percent cut in water use. Snow supplies about a third... - Posted on March 9, 2015