Teen wins Nobel Peace Prize, youngest winner ever Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, the joint winner of the Nobel Peace Prize (Reuters)
Teen wins Nobel Peace Prize, youngest winner ever
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Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan and Kailash Satyarthi of India have won the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize. They risked their lives to fight for children's rights. The announcement made Malala, a 17-year-old student, the youngest-ever Nobel winner.

The founder of the Nobel Prizes was Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel. He wanted the prize to honor special people that help end armed conflicts any place in the world.

The news set off celebrations on the streets of Mingora. It's the main town in Pakistan's volatile Swat Valley and where Mala Yousafzai is originally from. Residents greeted each other and distributed sweets. At the town's Khushal Public School, students danced.

Two years ago, when she was a student there, Malala was shot in the head by a gunman because she had insisted that girls as well as boys have the right to an education. She was sent to England to recover. Now she has continued both her activism and her studies.

Malala's father, Ziauddin Yousufzai, said the decision will further the rights of girls.

Pakistani Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan said the decision "has given pride to the whole of Pakistan."

Committee chairman Thorbjoern Jagland said it was important to reward both an Indian Hindu and a Pakistani Muslim for joining "in a common struggle for education and against extremism."

The second recipient of the prize, Satyarthi, 60, gave up his career as an electrical engineer in 1980. He has led the rescue of tens of thousands of child slaves. And he has developed a model for their education and rehabilitation.

"Child slavery is a crime against humanity. Humanity itself is at stake here. A lot of work still remains but I will see the end of child labor in my lifetime," Satyarthi said. "If any child is a child slave in any part of the world, it is a blot on humanity. It is a disgrace."

MPakistani Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan said the decision "has given pride to the whole of Pakistan."

The two winners will split the Nobel award of $1.1 million.

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COMMENTS (2)
  • cm2001KING
    10/22/2014 - 08:42 a.m.

    This article was about a girl named mala and she was shot by the Taliban and she was shot because she stood up for education but the Taliban didn't like that and shot her

    • edwina-Wre
      12/17/2014 - 10:25 a.m.

      she love to help child free to education, a reli like

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